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Avon Foundation Partners with The Hotline to Grant $500,000 to 25 Local Domestic Violence Programs

The Avon Foundation for Women, the world’s largest corporate-affiliated philanthropy that focuses on issues that matter most to women, has partnered with The Hotline to grant $500,000 to 25 local domestic violence advocacy programs in cities across the U.S. The grant is part of a larger effort by the two organizations that started with #GivingTuesday to raise funds and awareness for local and national domestic violence hotlines. Each of the grantees will receive $20,000 to continue operating hotlines that support domestic abuse victims and provide direct services for survivors in their communities.

“Across the country, domestic violence programs and shelters are operating with fewer resources and staff. When victims take the difficult step to reach out for help, many are in life-threatening situations,” says Katie Ray-Jones, chief executive officer of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “The generous dollars received from our partners at the Avon Foundation for Women will enable more victims to get the help they need whether it is for counseling, shelter, legal services or compassionate support as they try to live a life free from violence.”

Congratulations to the 25 local organizations receiving a $20,000 grant:

A SafePlace (Oakland, CA)
Alternatives to Domestic Violence, Casa de Paz (Riverside, CA)
Center for Community Solutions (San Diego, CA)
Connections for Abused Women and their Children (Chicago, IL)
Chrysalis (Phoenix, AZ)
Family Violence Prevention Services, Inc. (San Antonio, TX)
Genesis Women’s Shelter (Dallas, TX)
Houston Area Women’s Center (Houston, TX)
Interval House (Anaheim, CA)
1736 Family Crisis Center (Los Angeles, CA)
Need-A-Break Inc. (Dallas, CA)
Miami Dade Community Action and Human Services Dept. (Safespace) (Miami, FL)
My Sister’s Place (Washington, D.C.)
Option House, Inc. (San Bernardino, CA)
Partnership Against Domestic Violence (Atlanta, GA)
Peace Over Violence (Los Angeles, CA)
SafePlace (Austin, TX)
Safe Horizon (New York, NY
SafeHouse (Denver, CO)
Shelter for Battered Women (Safe Alliance) (Charlotte, NC)
The Family Place (Dallas, TX)
Women Against Abuse, Inc. (Philadelphia, PA)
WEAVE Inc. (Sacramento, CA)
YWCA Interim House (Detroit, MI)
YWCA of San Diego – Becky’s House (San Diego, CA)

Want to show your support for families affected by domestic violence? Please consider making a gift to your local program, one of the organizations listed above and/or the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

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Pamela Anderson Donates $60,000 to The Hotline

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She is probably best known for her career as an actress, but Pamela Anderson now spends most of her time raising funds for non-profit organizations worldwide. Anderson recently visited the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) to make a significant contribution and hear first-hand how advocates are making a difference in the lives of those affected by abuse.

Every day, advocates at The Hotline answer approximately 900 calls, chats and texts from victims, survivors, their friends and family seeking information about domestic violence. With one in four women, one in seven men and one in three teens experiencing physical, emotional or verbal abuse by an intimate partner in their lifetime, the need to provide resources and support for victims is critical. It is why The Pamela Anderson Foundation chose to donate $60,000 to the organization that has been answering calls around the clock since its inception in 1996.

“It was incredibly important for me to meet the men and women who, day in and day out, offer compassion and information to anyone who needs help with domestic violence. I am so happy to know that our donation will help ensure those seeking options will continue to find that trusted resource at The Hotline,” said Pamela Anderson, founder of The Pamela Anderson Foundation.

Anderson presented the check to Katie Ray-Jones, chief executive officer of The Hotline, who thanked the actress, author and philanthropist for her generous gift. “We know that Pamela is incredibly busy raising money to support her foundation, allowing her to donate to causes she believes in such as ours. We couldn’t do this work without supporters like The Pamela Anderson Foundation. We are grateful for people like her who have a place in their heart for the people we serve.”

Chideo, the charity network, captured Anderson’s visit to The Hotline; click on the image below to watch:

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Capps Reintroduces Bill to Protect Victims of Domestic Violence and Stalking

As we approach Mother’s Day, Rep. Lois Capps (CA-24) announced this week that she has reintroduced legislation to strengthen protections for women everywhere who are victims of domestic violence and stalking by closing loopholes that allow their abusers and stalkers access to guns.

Currently, more than three times as many women are murdered with guns used by their intimate partners than are murdered by strangers using a gun, knife, or any other weapon. Furthermore, dating partners were responsible for 35 percent of intimate partner homicides committed between 1976 and 2005, and the share of intimate partner homicides committed annually by current dating partners has been on the rise.

The Protecting Domestic Violence and Stalking Victims Act (H.R. 2216) would address these disturbing figures by closing several loopholes that currently exist in federal protections against gun violence for those who are victims of domestic violence or stalking. “We applaud the reintroduction of the Protecting Domestic Violence and Staking Victims Act,” said Ron LeGrand Vice President of Public Policy for the National Network to End Domestic Violence. “While federal law prohibits some perpetrators from keeping their firearms, dangerous loopholes remain for dating partners, stalkers, and abusers served with emergency temporary protective orders. Representative Capps’s bill closes these dangerous loopholes and will save countless lives when it is enacted.”

“In 2014, The Hotline conducted a survey where nearly 16 percent of the participants said their partners had access to guns, and a startling 67 percent said they believed their partner was capable of killing them,” said Katie Ray-Jones, chief executive officer of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “For those individuals, it is critical that we continue to work together to strengthen the law to protect survivors from firearm violence at the point when they first seek help.”

The bill has 18 original co-sponsors in Congress. It is supported by the National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Network to End Domestic Violence, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, National Center for Victims of Crime, Futures Without Violence, National Latin@ Network and Casa de Esperanza.

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National Domestic Violence Hotline Hosts NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for Informational Visit

AUSTIN, TEXAS – National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell visited the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) to learn more about domestic violence and to see first-hand victims’ advocates at work. Hotline management and staff members introduced Commissioner Goodell to advocates and led him on a tour of the call center that operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. On September 18, The Hotline announced that it had received a commitment from the NFL to provide significant resources to the organization that will help advocates answer every call, chat and text from domestic violence victims, survivors, their loved ones and even abusers for the next five years.

“We invited Commissioner Goodell and members of his staff to learn how our organization operates and to listen to some of the stories that our advocates hear every day from men and women affected by abuse. We appreciate him taking the time to help us highlight the extent of this national problem,” said Katie Ray-Jones, chief executive officer of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

As a direct result of the NFL’s multi-million dollar, multi-year commitment, The Hotline has transitioned 21 of its part time employees to full time status. Jones says she expects to hire even more advocates within the next few weeks to handle an additional 750 calls, chats and texts per day. The NFL’s support will also enable loveisrespect to service 24-hour-a-day text, chat and call services to young people affected by dating abuse. Loveisrespect is a project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and Break the Cycle that engages, educates and empowers young people to prevent and end abusive relationships.

Since the National Domestic Violence Hotline was first formed in 1996, the organization has never been able to answer every call for help because of a lack of resources. Last year, approximately 77,000 calls went unanswered. With greater awareness of abuse by the recent domestic violence incidents involving professional football players, more people are recognizing the signs of abuse in their own relationships and reaching out for help.

“Our call volume has remained at much higher levels than normal. Callers are reaching out to us to better understand abuse and many are seeking help that is long overdue. As awareness grows, so does the demand for our services and so does the need for more resources to serve those affected by abuse,” said Jones. “While the NFL commitment is significant and it will help us reach our goal of answering every call, we will still rely on the generosity of all of our partners and individual donors to meet the ever-increasing need for education, public awareness and additional victims’ services.”

Of those who reach out to The Hotline for help, 95% are experiencing emotional and verbal abuse including degradation, insults, humiliation, isolation, stalking, and threats of violence against themselves and their children and loved ones. Often, the abuser threatens suicide. More than 70% are experiencing severe physical violence and say they’ve been slapped, choked, punched, pistol whipped and beaten. This physical abuse has resulted in bruises, cuts, miscarriages, broken bones. Nearly 10% of those reaching out to The Hotline for help have experienced sexual violence. They’ve been raped, exploited, sexually coerced, even forced to get pregnant in order to keep them tied to their abuser.

About the National Domestic Violence Hotline

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Operating around the clock, confidential and free of cost, the Hotline provides victims and survivors with life-saving tools and immediate support. Callers to the hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 200 languages. Visitors to TheHotline.org can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization.

The Hotline relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. It is funded in part by Grant Number 90EV0407/03 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/ Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, a division of the Family and Youth Services Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Administration for Children and Families or the U.S. Department of HHS.

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National Domestic Violence Hotline Receives Long-term Commitment of Resources from National Football League

AUSTIN, TEXAS – The National Domestic Violence Hotline (the Hotline) is pleased to announce that the National Football League (NFL) has committed to providing significant resources to the organization that will allow the organization to answer virtually every call, chat and text from domestic violence victims, survivors, their loved ones and even abusers for the next five years.

“We have never had the funding needed to meet the demand for our services from those seeking help with domestic violence and dating abuse. Last year, because of this lack of resources, more than 77,000 calls went unanswered. Recent domestic violence incidents involving NFL players pushed the capacity of our organization to unprecedented levels,” said Katie Ray-Jones, president and chief executive officer of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “Because of this long-term commitment by the NFL to provide The Hotline with much-needed resources, our services will finally be accessible to all those who need us when they bravely take the first step to find safety and live a life free of abuse.”

Immediately following the release of video last week showing former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice punching his then-fiancée in an elevator, the Hotline’s call volume increased by 84% and has remained higher than normal with spikes happening after each new report about domestic violence charges against NFL players. As the controversies continue, the Hotline has been unable to answer nearly 50 percent of the calls, chats and texts.

“Our decision to enter into a long-term partnership with the NFL will help us immediately increase our ability to hire additional advocates, improve our infrastructure and provide more education about domestic violence that affects one in four women and one in seven men in their lifetimes,” said Maury Lane, chair of the board of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “It is important that we answer their calls.”

Of those who reach out to the Hotline for help, 95% are experiencing emotional and verbal abuse including degradation, insults, humiliation, isolation, stalking, and threats of violence against themselves and their children and loved ones. Often, the abuser threatens suicide. More than 70% are experiencing severe physical violence and say they’ve been slapped, choked, punched, pistol whipped and beaten. This physical abuse has resulted in bruises, cuts, miscarriages, broken bones. Nearly 10% of those reaching out to the Hotline for help have experienced sexual violence. They’ve been raped, exploited, sexually coerced, even forced to get pregnant in order to keep them tied to their abuser.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Operating around the clock, confidential and free of cost, the Hotline provides victims and survivors with life-saving tools and immediate support. Callers to the hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 200 languages. Visitors to TheHotline.org can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization.

The Hotline relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. It is funded in part by Grant Number 90EV0407/03 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/ Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, a division of the Family and Youth Services Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Administration for Children and Families or the U.S. Department of HHS.

 

Media Contact Information:

Lisa Lawrence

Phone: (512) 426-4904

E-mail: lisalawrencepr@gmail.com

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New Toolkit Released to Help Local and State Leaders Protect Women from Gun Violence

firearms and dvAmericans for Responsible Solutions (ARS), the gun violence prevention organization founded by former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, retired combat veteran and NASA astronaut Captain Mark Kelly, and the National Domestic Violence Hotline today announced a new report and toolkit, Saving Women’s Lives, to serve as a resource for state and local leaders to adopt best practices that will help protect domestic violence victims from gun violence.

In conjunction with release of the toolkit, ARS Co-Founder Gabrielle Giffords also announced the #ProtectAllWomen campaign urging women at state and local levels to work with leaders on the ground and encourage them to use the toolkit and resources to strengthen laws that keep guns out of the hands of domestic abusers and stalkers. The campaign will include targeted digital outreach and leadership training  around the country.

Read the full press release and download the toolkit here.

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Hotline Focus Survey Provides Firsthand Look at Intersection of Firearms & Domestic Violence; Highlights Need for Stronger Laws and Equal Protection

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June 18, 2014, Washington, DC – Today in Washington, DC, Rob Valente, National Domestic Violence Hotline policy expert presented highlights from a recent focus survey conducted by The Hotline on the use of firearms in domestic violence situations.  The survey revealed how the presence of a firearm in an abusive relationship intensifies the fear of abuse victims and escalates the violence directed towards them, regardless of whether or not the survivor is married, dating or being stalked by the abuser. Current laws offer protections for married victims of intimate partner abuse, but the same protection is not afforded to those who are in a dating relationship or those who are being stalked. Valente provided the preliminary results of the survey at a panel featuring Former U.S. Representative Gabby Giffords and Captain Mark Kelly, co-founders of Americans for Responsible Solutions, as well as U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar and Saundra Rhodes, Chief of Police of Horry County, South Carolina and domestic violence survivor, Sarah Engle.  Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress, Counselor to the Center for American Progress Action Fund moderated the panel which discussed the intersection between gun violence and violence against women.

One in four women and one in seven men 18 and older in America report they have been the victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime. When the abuser has access to firearms, the survey confirmed that victims’ fears intensify and the violence escalates. Statistics show that it also turns deadly. According to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, the presence of a gun in domestic violence situations increases the risk of homicide for women by 500 percent. More than half of women murdered with guns are killed by family members or intimate partners.1

Survey Findings

The findings from the eight week survey conducted this spring by The Hotline shows how guns are being used to coerce, intimidate and inflict injury.

Of those whose partners have access to firearms:

  • 22% said their partner had threatened to use their firearm to hurt themselves, their intimate partner, their children, family members, friends and even pets with a firearm.
  • 67% believe their partner is capable of killing them
  • 52% said they would feel safer if law enforcement took their partner/spouse/ex’s firearms
  • Only 34% said they were aware that the court may be able to order their partner to surrender their firearms and ammunition

Of those who said their partner had threatened them with a firearm:

  • 76% said their partner made verbal threats to use the gun
  • 24% of them said their partner waved the gun around
  • 25% said their partner pointed the gun at them or others
  • 30% said their partner left the gun out to create a feeling of fear
  • 54% said their partner had threatened suicide with the gun

Below are some of the anonymous stories told to The Hotline advocates during the eight week survey:

Hotline Survey Anecdotes:

One woman said that during a fight, her partner shot a gun at her. Someone called the police. Her partner was arrested on a violation of a restraining order, but the gun charges were dropped.

One participant in the survey said her partner sexually assaulted her with his gun by putting the gun inside her when she refused to have sex with him.

One caller said her abuser told their young child he would shoot the entire family and maybe others.

One woman’s partner shot her while she sat in her car, another said her husband threatened to shoot her in the face.

One of the women said her partner put a gun in his mouth while talking to her on an internet service. In another case, a husband recorded a video of how he would kill himself with his gun if she left him.

One caller told The Hotline advocate about her husband who sleeps with loaded guns under his pillow. Not long ago, she woke to the sound of him releasing the safety next to her head. His guns, she said, are regularly used to threaten her and abuse her.

Changes to Legislation Needed

Urging policy makers to take immediate action, National Domestic Violence Hotline policy expert, Rob Valente says, “We need stronger protections for victims now. The people who call the Hotline are brave and they are survivors. They’ve managed to stay alive. Every day at The Hotline, advocates listen to their stories and we hear them and we help them. Today, we must act as their voice, because if they were able to do so, they would tell lawmakers they’re scared, they want the fear and pain to stop and they need help.” The National Domestic Violence Hotline believes that in order for survivors to find safety and live lives free of abuse, changes are needed. Some of the specific ways in which the current legislation should be strengthened:

  • Protecting victims of dating violence and stalking from firearms violence—in addition to the existing protection for victims of domestic violence
  • Protecting victims at the time when they are in greatest danger—when they first go to court to seek help
  • Giving law enforcement the authority to seize firearms when there is probable cause to believe the firearms were used to commit domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking
  • Giving courts the authority to order that firearms used to commit domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking be removed from the abuser
  • Improving the entry of state data concerning domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking into the National Crime Information Center databases, so that the FBI has the information it needs to prevent adjudicated abusers from getting access to firearms

Domestic violence offenders commit more than a million acts of domestic violence each year, resulting in hundreds of deaths2, approximately 22 percent of which are gun-related.3

“Doing nothing is not an option. Right now, women are being terrorized in their own homes,” Valente said.

1J.C. Campbell, D.W. Webster, J. Koziol-McLain, et al., “Risk factors for femicide within physically abusive intimate relationships: results from a multi-site case control study,” 93 Amer. J. of Public Health 1089-1097 (2003).

2U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, J.Truman, L. Langton, & M. Planty, Criminal Victimization 2012 (Oct.2013) (Table 1) (1,259,390 incidents of domestic violence in 2012),

3http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-gun-policy-and-research/publications/IPV_Guns.pdf

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Avon Foundation For Women Pledges to Match December Donations to The National Domestic Violence Hotline For #GivingTuesday, Up to $200K

Austin, TX – November 26, 2013 — The advocates at the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) are builders. They work with callers to build safer families and homes. They help survivors build back their self-esteem after it’s been worn down from years of verbal abuse. They help build safer futures free from violence. Now, thanks to a matching donation opportunity from the Avon Foundation for Women, these builders could get a few more helping hands. During the month of December, the Avon Foundation will match donations made to NDVH up to $200,000. To highlight this extraordinary donation opportunity, NDVH employees will build a Gingerbread Hotline on December 3rd, #GivingTuesday.

Katie Ray-Jones, NDVH president said, “As a non-profit organization, we rely on the generosity of private donors and sponsors. Earlier this year, we answered the 3 millionth call to the hotline. Unfortunately, many calls go unanswered because of a lack of resources. With funds raised during this December drive, we will be able to answer more calls for help and continue our work of building better lives.”

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 1.25.23 PMThe matching gift from the Avon Foundation for Women will allow NDVH to create a pool of advocates who can be called upon to serve when they are needed most. Through this support, the organization will be able to staff more than 12,500 hours of advocate time for answering calls and online chats. This translates into an estimated 23,695 people served. The Avon Foundation for Women’s Speak Out Against Domestic Violence program has been a strong supporter of the hotline, giving more than $500,000 to the organization.

“The Avon Foundation’s #GivingTuesday donation aims to harness the power of our new social media campaign, #SeeTheSigns, to inspire women and men of all ages to raise awareness about a cause that is often hidden from the public eye,” said Avon Foundation for Women President Carol Kurzig. “One in every four women is a victim of domestic violence, and she may be your sister, daughter, friend or neighbor. The most meaningful gift we can give our loved ones, friends and neighbors this holiday season is a future free from violence. Every donation to the National Domestic Violence Hotline will help ensure that someone is available to answer the most important call of a victim’s life.”

When a visitor to thehotline.org makes a donation, he or she can select an embellishment of their choice and watch as it is attached to the Gingerbread Hotline. A pond filled with gummy fish? You’ve got it. A unicorn in the call center? Absolutely!  The NDVH conference room will be transformed into a winter wonderland where anyone can watch the building as it takes place via live video streaming. This Gingerbread Hotline build coincides with #GivingTuesday, the national campaign that harnesses the collective power of charities, families, businesses and individuals to transform how people think about, talk about and participate in the giving season.

Avon Foundation for Women and Avon Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

The Avon Foundation for Women launched Speak Out Against Domestic Violence in 2004 to support domestic violence awareness, education and prevention programs aimed at reducing domestic and gender violence, as well as direct services for victims and their families. Through 2013, the Avon Foundation for Women has donated nearly $38 million in the United States to support domestic violence programs, services and education. Globally, Avon supports efforts to end violence against women in nearly 50 countries by raising funds through special product sales and raising awareness through events and with educational information disseminated by more than 6 million global Avon Representatives. Visit www.avonfoundation.org for more information.

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Verizon Donates $250,000 to Launch Online Chat Service

VerizoncheckpresentingAnyone looking for information or help will now be able to chat live online with hotline advocates thanks to a $250,000 donation from Verizon, through its HopeLine program. Verizon has also given the hotline an opportunity to receive an additional $250,000 in matching funds through a national wireless phone drive.

HopeLine from Verizon collects no-longer-used cell phones and accessories in any condition from any service provider and turns them into support for domestic violence prevention organizations and local shelters in the form of cash grants, and wireless phones with text and voice service.

“Verizon leverages its technology and resources to help solve critical social issues,” said Torod Neptune, chief communications officer for Verizon Wireless.  “Partnering with the hotline to launch this online service will now provide victims with yet another way to get the help they need when they need it in the way they want it.”

Verizon has been a longtime supporter of the hotline. We are grateful for their generous gift that will extend our reach to help more victims in more ways.

To celebrate the launch of chat service and the very special visit of Vice President Joe Biden, many important Verizon team members joined us in Austin last week, including Senior Vice President of Human Resources, Alan Gardner; Executive Director of Public Affairs, Elva Lima; Vice President of External Affairs, David Russell and Vice President of Governmental Affairs, Richard Lawson. Below is a compilation of their time with us.

Consider hosting a phone drive in your community to raise phones to support the HopeLine project. Learn how.

 

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Avon Foundation for Women Awards $200,000 Grant to The National Domestic Violence Hotline

GIFT WILL INCREASE CAPACITY TO SERVE MORE VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

April 15, 2013 – The National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) announced that it has received a
$200,000 gift for 2013 from the Avon Foundation for Women to support NDVH’s efforts to answer
calls from domestic violence victims, friends and family members. Every day of the week, 24 hours a
day, NDVH has highly trained expert advocates available to talk confidentially with anyone affected by
domestic violence. NDVH provides callers with lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims
to find safety and live their lives free of abuse.

The gift is funding two new part-time advocate positions, which have just been filled, as well as
additional relief advocates, including bilingual advocates, to help respond to thousands of calls from
victims, their families and friends and even abusers. The Avon Foundation for Women’s Speak Out
Against Domestic Violence program has been a strong supporter of the hotline, giving more than
$500,000 to the organization.

“The Avon Foundation for Women’s Speak out Against Domestic Violence program is proud to be a long-
time supporter of the National Domestic Violence Hotline in its fight to end domestic violence,” said
Avon Foundation for Women President Carol Kurzig. “We are honored that our gift will directly affect
those who are calling the hotline for assistance with domestic violence, further extending the number of
calls the hotline is able to answer annually and bringing support to those who need it most.”

In 2012, nearly 53,000 calls for help to NDVH went unanswered due to a lack of resources. “In addition to our inability to answer every call, we have noticed a significant increase in Spanish-speaking calls to our emergency hotline and this grant will help us better meet the need for additional bilingual advocates to answer those calls,” said Katie Ray Jones, president of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “We are so grateful to the Avon Foundation for Women for their generous support for 16 years and their continued partnership with us in the fight to end domestic violence.”

Currently, many Spanish-speaking calls to the emergency hotline are being routed to an outside
language interpretation service. By keeping these calls inside, NDVH can provide a seamless service to
callers as well as a decrease in the call waiting time. With the 2012 Avon gift, the emergency hotline
was able to answer 31,522 calls.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline
Operating around the clock, seven days a week, 24/7, confidential and free of cost, the National
Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims
to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to the emergency hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
can expect highly trained experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention
information and referral services in more than 170+ languages. Visitors to www.NDVH.org can find
information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the
organization. NDVH is part of the largest nationwide network of programs and expert resources and
regularly shares insight about domestic violence with government officials, law enforcement agencies,
media and the general public. NDVH is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of
the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). It relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts
from corporations and foundations and federal grants. For more information, visit www.NDVH.org or
call 512.794.1133.

Avon Speak Out Against Domestic Violence
The Avon Foundation for Women launched Speak Out Against Domestic Violence in 2004 to support
domestic violence awareness, education and prevention programs aimed at reducing domestic and
gender violence, as well as direct services for victims and their families. Through the end of 2012, the
Avon Foundation for Women has donated $33 million in the United States to support domestic violence
programs, services and education. Globally, Avon supports efforts to end violence against women in
nearly 50 countries by raising funds through special product sales and raising awareness through events
and with educational information disseminated by more than 6 million global Avon Representatives.
Visit www.avonfoundation.org for more information.

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President of The Hotline Offers Comment Regarding Offensive T-shirts Removed For Sale on Amazon

March 4, 2013 – Katie Ray-Jones, President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) and the National Dating Abuse Helpline (NDAH) issued a statement today regarding t-shirts offered for sale by the company, Solid Gold Bomb on Amazon’s UK website.  The t-shirts that were available for sale up until last week read, “Keep Calm and Rape On” and “Keep Calm and Hit Her.” The founder of the company that offered the shirts for sale has expressed his apologies and has accepted responsibility for the computer error he created that ultimately resulted in the offensive t-shirts available for sale on Amazon.  You can see the founder’s apology at

www.solidgoldbomb.com. The t-shirt options have been removed from the company’s website and all Amazon channels worldwide.

“Every day, we receive approximately 600 calls from men and women in crisis. Intimate partner violence affects nearly one in every

four women and one in every seven men. It is never okay and it should never be trivialized. We are, therefore, encouraged by the level of outrage expressed by the global community over the potential sale of these offensive t-shirts. We are glad none were ever sold. The founder of the company whose admitted carelessness resulted in the generation of the slogans has expressed his sincere apologies for his mistake. We are satisfied by his apology and efforts by the company and Amazon  to swiftly correct the issue by removing the t-shirts for sale on all channels worldwide.”  – Katie Ray-Jones, President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline.

If you would like to interview a spokesperson about domestic violence, please contact Liz Bradford at 512.685.6298 or hotline.media@ndvh.org.

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President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline applauds reauthorization of Violence Against Women Act

February 28, 2013 – President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) and the National Dating Abuse Helpline (NDAH), Katie Ray-Jones issued the following statement today regarding the passage of the Violence Against Women Act:

“We applaud members of Congress for coming together to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. This legislation that extends protections to all victims no matter their race, legal status or sexual orientation sends an important message that no victim should be excluded from receiving critical resources that will help them live a life free of abuse.”

If you would like to interview a spokesperson about domestic violence, please contact Liz Bradford at 512.685.6298 or hotline.media@ndvh.org.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline
Operating around the clock, seven days a week, 24/7, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to the emergency hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 170+ languages. Visitors to www.NDVH.org can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization. The NDVH is part of the largest nationwide network of programs and expert resources and regularly shares insight about domestic violence with government officials, law enforcement agencies, media and the general public. The NDVH is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). It relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. For more information, visit www.NDVH.org or call 512.794.1133.

About the National Dating Abuse Helpline
The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, operating the 24/7 phone, text and chat services. The Helpline, originally known as “loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline,” was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor, Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults. Accessible by phone or internet, the National Dating Abuse Helpline operates from a call center in Austin, Texas. The Helpline offers real-time, one-on-one support from peer advocates. We train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned friends, parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.