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The Hotline Receives National Crime Victim Service Award

Today, the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) announced that the National Domestic Violence Hotline is receiving a National Crime Victim Service Award. This award recognizes individuals and organizations from across the nation that are leading efforts to advance victim services and victims’ rights.

Hotline CEO Katie Ray-Jones was in Washington, DC to accept the award on behalf of the more than 200 staff members who work every day to shift power back to those affected by relationship abuse. “We do this work for the survivor who told an advocate, ‘I have been afraid to ask for help for 16 years. This is the first time I have reached out…It gives me hope I never thought could be.’ We do this work so that someone is there the first time and every time a person reaches out for support,” she said.

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From left to right: Joye E. Frost, Director, Office for Victims of Crime; Karol V. Mason, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs; Loretta E. Lynch, Attorney General of the United States; Katie Ray-Jones, CEO of the National Domestic Violence Hotline

The Hotline, which is commemorating 20 years of service this year, operates as a 24/7 lifeline for victims and survivors of domestic violence nationwide. Since 1996, we have answered over 3.8 million calls, chats and texts from those seeking support, resources and hope. In 2015, The Hotline opened an office in Washington, DC, to expand our digital services capabilities and establish a base from which to advocate for policies that protect and support survivors. We continue to explore innovative ways to increase our outreach, particularly to underserved communities.

The Hotline would like to congratulate our fellow 2016 award winners and express our deepest thanks to the Office for Victims of Crime for their ongoing support and recognition. Together, we will continue to work toward a world where all relationships are positive, healthy and free from violence.

Watch the OVC’s tribute video for The Hotline:

crime victims rights

It’s National Crime Victim’s Rights Week

“A right is not what someone gives you; it’s what no one can take from you.” — Ramsey Clark


Each year 18.7 million Americans are directly harmed by crime — and this statistic doesn’t include the countless number of family, friends and co-workers who are also impacted by these tragedies.

Yesterday marked the beginning of National Crime Victim’s Rights Week (April 21-27). Since 1981, the Office for Victims of Crime has dedicated this week to promoting victims’ rights and honoring both victims and those who advocate on their behalf. This year’s theme is “New Challenges. New Solutions” which focuses on OVC’s initiative, “Transforming Victim Services.”

As a national organization committed to ending domestic violence, this is a crucial week for us to reflect upon and think about victims of these and other crimes. Each day we advocate for victim’s rights, and there has been great progress made. It was only last month that we saw the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, with new provisions extending the protection of Native American women and members of the LGBT community.

Still, it only takes a quick look around us — in the media, at our congressional hearings, in everyday dialogue — to see that challenges remain. According to OVC, about 50% of violent crimes are not reported, and only a fraction of victims receive the help they need. Domestic violence remains one of the most underreported crimes, for various reasons. Every day we speak to victims who are in fear of being deported, losing custody of their children, becoming financially unstable, or not being believed. Victims’ rights are not all equal, and often go unenforced or ignored.

As demonstrated through this national week of recognition each year, conversation and collaboration is necessary for further change.

Domestic Violence Is a Crime

In 2010, violent crimes by intimate partners totaled 509,230 — 13% of all violent crimes. Of female murder victims in 2010, 38% were killed by a husband or boyfriend. Sixty four percent of female victims experienced violence by an intimate partner during their lifetime.

Learn More

If you or someone you know is a victim of intimate partner violence, call The Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE to confidentially speak with an advocate. We can provide you with info on safety planning and next steps, as well as give you resources for learning more about victim rights.

To get more involved, check out the National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events to see if there is anything you can attend in your area, or organize your own event. For more information about victims of assault, domestic violence, stalking, child abuse, sexual assault and other crimes, download the Help Series brochures.

Learn more about the history of victim’s rights (Section 5).

Follow the hashtag #NCVRW2013 on Twitter throughout the week to learn more.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

National Crime Victims’ Rights Week

Each April since 1981, the Office of Justice Programs has helped lead communities throughout the country in observing National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW) by promoting victims’ rights and honoring crime victims and those who advocate on their behalf.

This year’s theme is Crime Victims’ Rights: Fairness. Dignity. Respect. Communities throughout the nation are rallying in support of NCVRW. This is a time for everyone to learn about victimization, reflect on the devastating effects crime has on our community and society and to support the laws, policies and programs that aid victims of crime. Please click here to visit the official Office of Justice Programs 2010 NCVRW page.