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The Hotline Celebrates the Grand Opening of a New Digital Services Office in Washington, DC

For nearly 20 years, the National Domestic Violence Hotline has been headquartered in Austin, TX. We took our first call in 1996 and since then have received more than 3.5 million contacts. In 2013, we debuted our live chat services via thehotline.org, a crucial lifeline that gave victims and survivors another way to reach out if they couldn’t or didn’t want to speak by phone.

Now, in 2015, we are proud to announce that The Hotline is expanding to include an additional office in Washington, DC. On July 15, friends and partners from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Football League (NFL) and within the DV field gathered with Hotline staff to celebrate the grand opening of our new digital services office.

Hotline DC Opening

More and more domestic violence victims and survivors rely on technology like computers, smartphones and tablets to search for help and information on domestic violence and dating abuse. By expanding our operations, The Hotline is better equipped to meet victims where they are by providing much needed services through online chat and text messaging. We are sharing the new space with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, one of the original resource centers created by the Family Violence Prevention Services Act (FVPSA).  Through projects like VAWnet and the DV Evidence Project, the NRCDV has been instrumental in collecting information critical to domestic violence service providers and making it easily accessible online.

Hotline DC Opening 2

This is an exciting time for The Hotline and all of our partners and supporters. Although small, the DC office represents the start of a big idea – digital service centers across the country, which will allow us to extend our capacity to serve victims and survivors during peak times in each time zone. It’s another step toward our goal of answering every call, chat and text for help.

Check out the video below to hear a few words from special guests at the grand opening:

We want to thank the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, and our partners at the NFL and Mary Kay Inc. for their support.

If you would like to show your support for victims and survivors of domestic violence, please consider making a gift to The Hotline

manup-blog

Man Up!

Today’s post was written by Crayton Webb, Mary Kay Vice President of Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility. It first appeared on the Mary Kay Blog. Republished with permission.

Suck it up! No pain, no gain! Be a man! You play like a girl!

How many times has someone said one of these things to you? How many times have you said it? Thought about it? Maybe you thought it, but stopped short. These phrases are engrained in our society. They’re a deep part of the way we define what it means to be a man and what it means to be a woman.

As the father of three boys under the age of seven who works for a company dedicated to enriching women’s lives and committed to being the corporate leader to end domestic violence, I’ve been shocked at the number of times I caught myself thinking one of these things. I thought I would be different! Better, maybe. I expected myself to at least be more sensitive. Thank God I stopped myself before the words crossed my lips.

If we really want to end domestic violence – we have to stop it before it starts. And that begins, frankly, with men. Men have to own violence against women as a man’s issue – a man’s problem. We have to get to the next generation of men – boys my sons’ age – and change the way they and we look at women and look at ourselves.

For men to be part of the solution we have to change the way we think, the way we behave, the way we’re raised and the way we raise our children – both our sons and daughters. We have to change the way men talk to each other and our children; the way we treat each other; the way we hold each other accountable as men.

That’s a big task! So, where do we start? I say, let’s start with something small that speaks volumes. Let’s embrace the gift of parenthood and the obligation and duty we have to raise our children – the next generation – to be better than we are. Let’s begin by taking on a simple phrase – one we’ve all heard a million times – or maybe we’ve said it. It’s time re-define, re-think and re-frame what it means to be a man and what it means to “MAN UP.”

Click here to watch Mary Kay’s “Man Up” video and learn more about how you can be part of the change!

webb-125Crayton Webb, Vice President of Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility at Mary Kay Inc, oversees the company’s global media and public relations team and is also responsible for Mary Kay’s global CSR and philanthropic efforts. Crayton is chairman of the men’s auxiliary for Genesis Women’s Shelter in Dallas, HeROs (He Respects Others), and was recently appointed to the board of the Texas Council on Family Violence in Austin, Texas.  Follow Crayton on Twitter @craytonwebb.

Mary Kay survey

Get Back Your Green: Tips for Economic Recovery After Abuse

“Money makes the world go round.” If you’ve ever struggled with money, you know the truth behind that frustrating saying. Financial issues can make you feel stuck, like your whole world is on hold. For someone leaving abuse or thinking about leaving, this can be one of biggest factors that gets in the way.

A survey sponsored by Mary Kay, Inc. in 2012 found that 74% of survivors stayed with an abusive partner for longer than they wanted to because of financial concerns. It’s also one of the main barriers for those who are trying to leave.

Exiting an abusive situation is more challenging if a victim is stressing about finances while trying to rebuild their life. Financial difficulties can also be a reason victims return to abusers.

In a time when there are so many other things to think about and plan for, how do you safeguard against some of the financial risks that come with leaving?  We’ve put together some tips for economic safety and recovery that are helpful right after leaving. Please know that these may not be the right options for everyone. Please evaluate your own situation, and keep your safety in mind.


Securing your financial information

If your ex has knowledge of or access to your passwords, SSN, credit card statements or other identifying info, it could be a good idea to take measures to keep your personal info safe.

Call banks, credit card companies and utility companies (including wireless phone services) to change your account numbers, PIN numbers and passwords. Change the passwords to online banking and email accounts.

Close any joint credit cards. You may consider opening your own checking account and applying for a credit card if you don’t already have one, in order to start building your own credit history.

To further secure your financial information, open a P.O. box for mail and any financial documents you might receive.

Accessing your credit report

A credit report shows if bills and loans have been paid on time and if there are any outstanding loans or money owed. You can request a free copy of your credit report from any of the following agencies — and that’s a good place to start. Review your credit report at least once a year.

Equifax at 1-800-525-6285

Experian at 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742)

TransUnion at 1-800-680-7289

Annual Credit Report at 1-877-322-8228

Credit reports can determine the amount and interest rate of loans you apply for. A good credit history is also important for renting a home, getting insurance, applying for a job and more — employers, insurance companies and creditors often check your credit report.

Addressing and rebuilding a bad credit report

In starting to repair a bad credit score, remember to make consistent payments on rent and loans. While these often won’t show up on your credit report, you can ask landlords, utility companies and other creditors to supply this info when you’re applying for credit. A record of on-time payments looks good.

You can also ask these people to write positive credit reference letters for you when you’re applying for credit.

Building up a good credit score takes time, but paying bills on time, paying off debt, correcting and disputing any mistakes and refraining from building up additional debt are steps in the right direction.


Additional Resources

Local domestic violence programs have different resources you can access for support and these programs can also help with your safety concerns after leaving. If you call NDVH at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) our advocates can locate programs in your community.

  • The Allstate Foundation’s Click to Empower is an organization designed specifically to assist survivors with economic challenges. They have online resources, courses and grants to help survivors “get safe, stay safe and thrive.”
  • The Women’s Institute for Financial Education (WIFE) has many helpful articles in the Divorce category.
  • Women’s Law includes more information on financial protections to take if you’re getting ready to leave or have just left an abusive relationship.

Are you a survivor who faced financial hardships once you left? How did you handle financial obstacles?

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and across the country family violence programs, shelters, community groups, law enforcement, students and many more are planning events to help bring awareness to this devastating issue affecting millions of Americans.

Below are a few of the events The Hotline will be participating in during DVAM. To find events in your area, visit http://dvam.vawnet.org/index.php.

Shop Til It Stops

This October, you can help end domestic violence by simply purchasing a pair of shoes at any of the  Marshalls stores.  For each pair of shoes sold during this period, $1 (up to $150,000) will be donated to the National Domestic Violence Hotline.  Marshalls has worked to put an end to domestic violence through their Shop Til It Stops program. Visit www.marshallsonline.com to find a store near you, and join Marshalls in support of The Hotline’s efforts to end domestic violence.

Texas Stars

The Texas Stars have teamed up with The Hotline, and has declared Friday, October 14th “Domestic Violence Awareness Night” at the game. A percentage of proceeds from the ticket sales using the “GoStars” promo code will be donated to The Hotline to help increase awareness about domestic violence.

To purchase tickets to the game, click here. You will need to use the Promo Code: gostars. Must purchase online, not valid at box office or after noon on game day.

If you live out of the area and can’t attend the game, you can still support The Hotline by purchasing a ticket and donating it to The Hotline. We will share the tickets with Hotline and local advocates and domestic violence victims. If you wish to donate a ticket for the game, click here. Remember to use the promo code: gostars.

Unity Days

On October 4, 2011, the domestic violence community will join together to take part in the 2011 National Call of Unity.  On this free, 45 minute national call, we’ll hear from survivors, advocates, national experts, and government officials working to end domestic and sexual violence.  Together, we’ll share in a collective moment of silence for all the women, children, and men who have lost their lives to intimate partner violence and we’ll hear a dramatic recitation from nationally renowned spoken word artists Sunni Patterson and Asia Rainey.

You can join the call from anywhere however you must register to get the call-in information. To register, click here.

Mary Kay

Mary Kay is working to help change lives and end the cycle of violence.  You can help by asking your friends to “Like” the Mary Kay Facebook page.  For every new Facebook fan through October 31st, Mary Kay will donate $1, up to $1 million, to the Mary Kay Foundation who works to end domestic violence.  www.facebook.com/marykay