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announcement

President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline applauds reauthorization of Violence Against Women Act

February 28, 2013 – President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) and the National Dating Abuse Helpline (NDAH), Katie Ray-Jones issued the following statement today regarding the passage of the Violence Against Women Act:

“We applaud members of Congress for coming together to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. This legislation that extends protections to all victims no matter their race, legal status or sexual orientation sends an important message that no victim should be excluded from receiving critical resources that will help them live a life free of abuse.”

If you would like to interview a spokesperson about domestic violence, please contact Liz Bradford at 512.685.6298 or hotline.media@ndvh.org.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline
Operating around the clock, seven days a week, 24/7, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to the emergency hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 170+ languages. Visitors to www.NDVH.org can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization. The NDVH is part of the largest nationwide network of programs and expert resources and regularly shares insight about domestic violence with government officials, law enforcement agencies, media and the general public. The NDVH is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). It relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. For more information, visit www.NDVH.org or call 512.794.1133.

About the National Dating Abuse Helpline
The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, operating the 24/7 phone, text and chat services. The Helpline, originally known as “loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline,” was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor, Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults. Accessible by phone or internet, the National Dating Abuse Helpline operates from a call center in Austin, Texas. The Helpline offers real-time, one-on-one support from peer advocates. We train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned friends, parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.

announcement

National Domestic Violence Hotline Projects Three Million Calls One Year Earlier Than Expected

Washington, DC – The National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) announced that it expects to reach a critical milestone nearly one year earlier than expected – answering three million calls since the hotline’s inception in 1996. Today’s announcement was made at a special congressional briefing to highlight the important role the NDVH plays in assisting all victims of domestic violence.

The NDVH is a nationwide organization staffed by highly trained advocates who give victims of abuse lifesaving tools and referrals to programs that can immediately help. Unlike hotlines serving only one state or geographic area, the NDVH provides access to the largest national network of resources and shelters and is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 170 languages. Last year, the hotline received 265,000 calls from victims, survivors, their families and friends, service providers and abusers.

“The positive news is that more people in crisis are accessing the hotline for help and utilizing the services and resources we provide,” said Katie Ray-Jones, President of the NDVH. “But it’s also a sad and sobering reminder that domestic violence continues to be a national health problem in our country.”

The congressional briefing brought together a panel of experts to discuss the issue of domestic violence — what it means and how best to tackle the growing need for services and technology to support victims of abuse. The panel included representatives from the NDVH, Casa de Esperanza and Verizon Wireless.

“Because one in four Latinas will experience domestic violence in their lifetime and Hispanics comprise over 20 percent of the callers to the hotline, we believe that greater access to information and resources like the NDVH for Latino communities is vital in our outreach and support of victims,” said Amy Sanchez, chief executive officer for external relations of Casa de Esperanza.

The NDVH provides help to members of all communities regardless of race, age, gender or sexual orientation. As a non-profit organization, the hotline relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations as well as federal grants.

“Today’s announcement underscores the need for strong public/private partnerships and corporate resources to increase awareness of domestic violence and further prevention efforts,” said Elva Lima, executive director of public relations for Verizon Wireless. “We are honored to be a part of today’s panel and committed to our partnership with the NDVH.”

Exclusive to Verizon, HopeLine puts Verizon technology and the nation’s most reliable and largest wireless network to work in communities by turning no-longer-used wireless phones and accessories into support for victims and survivors of domestic violence and helps protect the environment by disposing of wireless phones and accessories in an environmentally sound way. Those seeking help can also dial #HOPE from their Verizon wireless phones to be connected directly to the NDVH.

Callers to the hotline may be experiencing physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional/verbal abuse, addiction and abuse, financial abuse, reproductive coercion and many other complex circumstances and situations.

“Unlike other important milestones, like birthdays or anniversaries, responding to three million calls at the hotline is not a cause for celebration.” said Dyanne Purcell, chief executive officer of the NDVH.   “Our hope is that today’s announcement and discussion elevate the dialogue and heighten awareness about the issue of domestic violence.”

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline

Operating around the clock seven days a week, 24/7, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) provides crisis intervention, information and referral services to victims of domestic violence, their friends and families and even their abusers. Callers to the emergency hotline, 1-800-799-SAFE, can expect highly-trained experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, counseling and instruction for finding safety. Visitors to www.NDVH.org can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization. The NDVH has the largest nationwide network of programs and expert resources and regularly shares insight about domestic violence with government officials, law enforcement agencies, media and the general public. The NDVH is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). It relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. For more information, visit www.NDVH.org or call 512.794.1133.

announcement

Our Three Millionth Call Will Come One Year Earlier Than Expected

Today The Hotline is announcing that we expect to reach a critical milestone nearly one year earlier than expected — answering three million calls since The Hotline’s inception in 1996. Today’s announcement was made at a special congressional briefing to highlight the important role The Hotline plays in assisting victims of domestic violence.

“The positive news is that more people in crisis are accessing The Hotline for help and utilizing the services and resources we provide,” said Katie Ray-Jones, president of The Hotline. “But it’s also a sad and sobering reminder that domestic violence continues to be a national health problem in our country.”

The congressional briefing brought together a panel of experts to discuss the issue of domestic violence — what it means and how best to tackle the growing need for services and technology to support victims of abuse. The panel included representatives from the The Hotline, Casa de Esperanza and Verizon Wireless.

“Because one in four Latinas will experience domestic violence in their lifetime and Hispanics comprise over 20 percent of the callers to The Hotline, we believe that greater access to information and resources like The Hotline for Latino communities is vital in our outreach and support of victims,” said Amy Sanchez, chief executive officer for external relations of Casa de Esperanza.

The Hotline provides help to members of all communities regardless of race, age, gender or sexual orientation. As a non-profit organization, we rely on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations as well as federal grants.

“Today’s announcement underscores the need for strong public/private partnerships and corporate resources to increase awareness of domestic violence and further prevention efforts,” said Elva Lima, executive director of public relations for Verizon Wireless. “We are honored to be a part of today’s panel and committed to our partnership with the The Hotline.”

Exclusive to Verizon, HopeLine puts Verizon technology and the nation’s most reliable and largest wireless network to work in communities by turning no-longer-used wireless phones and accessories into support for victims and survivors of domestic violence and helps protect the environment by disposing of wireless phones and accessories in an environmentally sound way. Those seeking help can also dial #HOPE from their Verizon wireless phones to be connected directly to The Hotline.

Callers to The Hotline may be experiencing physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional/verbal abuse, addiction and abuse, financial abuse, reproductive coercion and many other complex circumstances and situations.

“Unlike other important milestones, like birthdays or anniversaries, responding to three million calls at the hotline is not a cause for celebration,” said Dyanne Purcell, chief executive officer of The Hotline. “Our hope is that today’s announcement and discussion will heighten the dialogue and awareness about the issue of domestic violence.”

announcement

National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline extend sympathy to families of Jovan Belcher and Kasandra Perkins; offer 24 hour support and resources for all affected by domestic violence

December 2, 2012 – Officers of The National Domestic Violence Hotline and The National Dating Abuse Helpline offer deepest sympathies to the families and friends of Kansas City Chiefs player Jovan Belcher and his girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins who authorities say were killed yesterday in an apparent murder-suicide. While law enforcement officials continue their investigation into this tragedy, we want to remind all who are affected by domestic violence that support and resources are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at www.TheHotline.org  or 1-800-799-SAFE and www.LoveIsRespect.org or 1-866-331-9474.

“Today we extend our condolences to those affected by the violent deaths of Mr. Belcher and Miss Perkins. Tragically, we know from studies on murder-suicides in the U.S. that there are between 1,000 and 1,500 deaths per year in the United States as a result of murder-suicide and that three women die daily as a result of domestic violence. It is a national health problem that is not going away, but help for victims and those who love them is available,” said Katie Ray-Jones, president of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

Critical life-saving resources and support for victims, survivors, their family and friends and even abusers can be found at both hotlines that offer services around the clock in English and Spanish. Callers in crisis can expect to speak to an advocate who will triage the situation and quickly define the next steps so that they can reach safety and remain safe.  All calls to The Hotline and The Helpline are confidential.

If you would like to interview a spokesperson about domestic violence, please contact Liz Bradford at 512.685.6298 or hotline.media@ndvh.org.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline

The National Domestic Violence Hotline was established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress. The Hotline is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families. The Hotline answers a variety of calls and is a resource for domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public.

About the National Dating Abuse Helpline 

The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, operating the 24/7 phone, text and chat services. The Helpline, originally known as “loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline,” was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor, Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults. Accessible by phone or internet, the National Dating Abuse Helpline operates from a call center in Austin, Texas.

The Helpline offers real-time, one-on-one support from peer advocates. We train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned friends, parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.

Acknowledgements:

TheHotline.org is supported by Grant Number 90EV0407/03 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/Administration for Children and Families. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Administration for Children and Families or the U.S. Department of HHS.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

DVAM Challenge 11: The Journey of Hope

In honor of DVAM, we have teamed up with Verizon for the Journey of Hope. The Journey of Hope is a cross-country bus tour which will help raise awareness of domestic violence and provide resources to those affected by it.

“We are honored to be a part of Verizon’s campaign to help end domestic violence and pleased to partner with a corporation that inspires their employees and community members to get involved in this important social issue,” said our own Katie Ray-Jones, president of The Hotline and The National Dating Abuse Helpline, who will be travelling with the bus for several stops. “Verizon is a key supporter in our mission to prevent this silent epidemic, and we look forward to seeing the communities’ response to our efforts.”

The Journey of Hope kicked off its trip on Oct. 3 in Basking Ridge, N.J. at Verizon’s headquarters with a Walk for Hope event. More than 500 employees joined together to support domestic violence victims and survivors (Verizon pledged to donate $100 to The Hotline for every staff member that attended) and teen recording artist Jasmine Villegas was on hand to offer entertainment to participants.

Throughout the tour, members of the travelling group, including Katie, will speak with people affected by domestic violence and those working to end domestic violence in our communities. Everyone is invited to visit the bus, which will stop in six cities, to share their stories of support, survival, hope and perseverance.

People who visit the bus will also have the opportunity to donate used cell phones to Verizon’s HopeLine project (which we highlighted in DVAM challenge 10). Phones collected through the HopeLine recycling drives are either refurbished and sold or recycled, and the proceeds are donated to organizations that work against domestic violence in the form of cash grants and prepaid Verizon Wireless phones for survivors.

Since the launch of HopeLine in 2001, Verizon has awarded more than $14.2 million in cash grants to domestic violence agencies around the country, and nearly 123,000 phones have been handed out to those affected by domestic violence.

At The Hotline, we want to thank Verizon for their longstanding commitment to making a positive difference in the lives of those affected by domestic violence.

DVAM Challenge 11:

Raise awareness and show your support for those affected by domestic violence by wearing a purple piece of clothing. When people ask you about your outfit, tell them about domestic violence and DVAM. And don’t forget to send us a picture of your purple clothes — email us at submissions@ndah.org.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The Hotline Encourages Everyone to Get Involved and Help Raise Awareness During October for National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Today welcomed October, National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, as a chance for everyone  – victims, survivors, advocates, law enforcement, supporters and political leaders – to unite in our work to end abuse.

“We want the public to know The National Domestic Violence Hotline is the only national Hotline in the United States for victims of domestic violence and we are open 24-hours a day, every day for women, men, children and families in danger,” said Katie Ray-Jones, President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.  “We also want to take this opportunity in October to raise awareness about The Hotline and get more people across the country involved in creating change.”

Throughout October, communities across the country will celebrate the tremendous progress victim advocates have made over the years, mourn for those whose lives were taken by domestic violence and connect with one another with a true sense of unity to end domestic violence.

We also want to empower everyone to get involved and help raise awareness about domestic violence.  We recognize the power that each one of us has in making a difference for someone. At The Hotline, every call is a chance for healing and change.

This year we’re launching a special DVAM campaign that EVERYONE can be involved in.  For 20 days in October, we’ve developed special challenges.  We want you to complete these challenges and share your achievement with us.  By taking our daily challenges, you’re saying that TODAY you are taking a step towards ending domestic violence.

We will be using a blog and our Facebook/Twitter accounts as we go through this month.  Every Friday starting on October 12, we will dedicate our blog to celebrating what our users are doing in their own communities.

One in four women will be the victim of domestic violence at some point in her lifetime, and, on average, three women are killed every day at the hands of a current or former intimate partner.

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A Man Can

On January 4, The Hotline was honored with a visit from sportscaster James Brown, host of CBS Network’s “The NFL Today” and representatives of The Verizon Foundation is support of his A Man Can campaign.

“Domestic violence is an epidemic in all of our communities,” Brown said.  “That deepened my personal commitment and desire to help end domestic violence.  It’s my hope that millions of men join me in this campaign.”

Through this campaign, Brown is promoting respect and equality – respect for yourself and in your relationships — and he’s asking men to be informed and be appropriately proactive when they witness disrespectful or abusive behavior.

“I’m here to encourage men and help them understand that they can have a very meaningful impact, much more easily than they think,” Brown said.  “Don’t laugh at that inappropriate joke.  Second, don’t condone domestic violence with your silence.  If you know someone who is abusive – physically, verbally, emotionally or financially – you as men can play a positive role, just like the coach of a team, and be helpful in changing behavior.  This campaign will build awareness around the issues of domestic violence prevention and the resources available for helping those experiencing domestic violence and those who perpetrate it.”

Rose Stuckey Kirk, president of the Verizon Foundation, said: “Domestic violence knows no boundaries.  It affects men and women, every race, every culture and all socioeconomic levels.  That’s why a very important part of this campaign is educating men and women on how to help someone in need.  That means referring people in need – men and women who are experiencing domestic violence – to resources that can help them live a violence-free life. Verizon welcomes this partnership with James Brown, whose leadership and commitment have helped elevate domestic violence prevention in our national dialogue.”

During the visit, a film crew documented Brown’s tour including conversations with Hotline President Katie Ray-Jones, listening on Hotline crisis calls, a discussion group, and a one-on-one meetings with a survivor to further educate himself on the issues of domestic violence. The final video of documenting Brown’s Experience is available below and on YouTube.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

Regional Town Hall on Engaging Men and Stopping Violence Against Women

Townhall The Hotline President Katie Ray-Jones and loveisrespect.org Youth Advisory Board Member Angela Garcia-Ditta from Austin participated in a town hall meeting convened by Vice President Joe Biden in Dallas on October 25, 2011. The two served on the panel, fielding questions from audience members around the issue of domestic violence, especially as it’s seen on college campuses. Students from several local Texas universities were in attendance.

Vice President Biden convened town hall meetings in 10 states across the country to focus on domestic violence during Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October. The goal was to get more men involved in speaking out against dating abuse and domestic violence.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

Letter from the President

Dear Friends and Colleagues:

In October of 1981, the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence organized a “Day of Unity.” On that day, thirty years ago, advocates from across the country joined together in their commitment to end domestic violence. The “Day of Unity” evolved into a full week of activities designed to promote awareness, and that week gradually progressed into the Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

The first official Domestic Violence Awareness Month was held in October of 1987; it preceded the launch of the National Domestic Violence Hotline by nearly a decade. The Hotline was fortunate to enter into such a rich tradition, and year by year, we are honored to provide a platform for some of the most important voices in the movement: survivors, advocates, friends, and families. Every year, Domestic Violence Awareness Month holds a special place in our hearts. Its mission mirrors the mission that we strive to uphold 24 hours a day, 365 days a year: to give hope and a voice to those who have been affected by domestic violence across the nation. To date, the Hotline has held space for over 2.5 million voices, and we continue to receive over 22,500 calls per month.

On October 4th, the Hotline has the privilege to join the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence in the 2011 National Call of Unity. Much like the “Day of Unity” thirty years ago, the National Call of Unity continues in the vital tradition of honoring those affected by intimate partner violence across the nation and uniting the advocates working on their behalf. We will hear from Kalyn Risker, founder of SAFE: Sisters Acquiring Financial Empowerment, as she shares the story of her own incredible journey. Then, following a collective moment of silence, artists Sunni Patterson and Asia Rainey will share a dramatic recitation they have prepared for the occasion.

In addition, this month we celebrate with The National Dating Abuse Helpline and Break the Cycle, who just launched the new loveisrespect.org. Loveisrespect.org now offers 24 hour advocacy for those experiencing dating abuse, and we are excited to announce that help is now available via text! On September 27th the service was first used by Vice President Joe Biden, and on September 28th this breakthrough was featured on “The View.” The website is also full of new features and information, including new segments for those in the LGBTQ community, those seeking legal assistance, and those experiencing digital abuse.

Thank you so much for your support – past, present, and future – of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and loveisrespect.org. It is an honor to serve those affected by domestic and dating abuse, and it is to our continued delight that we are able to share in this work with you.

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Katie Ray Jones
President
National Domestic Violence Hotline
National Dating Abuse Helpline

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

17th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women’s Act

National Domestic Violence Hotline CEO Dyanne Purcell and Hotline President Katie Ray-Jones joined Vice President Joe Biden and Dr. Jill Biden in Washington D.C. for the 17th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act yesterday. Other leaders in the domestic violence movement were also in attendance to celebrate the achievements of VAWA, which was first passed in 1994 in the efforts to better protect victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. The Violence Against Women Act was a landmark piece of legislation that in addition to other great accomplishments, created the National Domestic Violence Hotline. Then-senator Joe Biden was the chief author of the original legislation and has been instrumental in supporting not only The Hotline, but also working to end violence against women and girls.

“The Violence Against Women Act is the cornerstone of our nation’s response to domestic violence, providing lifesaving services to victims of domestic violence and their children,” said CEO Dyanne Purcell. “We praise Vice President Joe Biden and his leadership on this critical issue to ensuring victims of domestic violence and their children have a national hotline to call for help and that a nationwide network of domestic violence services will be there when families reach out for help.

See Dyanne’s pictures of the event below:

Read the White House blog post on the 17th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act to learn more about this occasion.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

43% of Dating College Women Have Experienced Violent and Abusive Dating Behaviors

A new survey reveals dating violence and abuse to be surprisingly more prevalent among college students than previously believed. Nearly half of dating college women (43%) report having ever experienced violent or abusive dating behaviors, and more than one in five (22%) report actual physical abuse, sexual abuse or threats of physical violence. Despite the high number of students experiencing these types of abuse, more than one-third of college students (38%) say they would not know how to get help on campus if they found themselves in an abusive relationship.

The survey, “Liz Claiborne Inc.’s Love Is Not Abuse 2011 College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll,” was conducted by Knowledge Networks to address the lack of data on dating violence and abuse among college students and to increase the understanding of this problem on college campuses nationwide.

According to dating violence expert, Dr. Karen Singleton, Director of Sexual Violence Response, a program of Columbia University Health Services, “This survey expands on earlier reports and reinforces the complexity of the issue.” Among the findings are:

  • Nearly 1 in 3 (29%) college women report having been a victim of an abusive dating relationship in her life.
  • 57% of students who report having been in an abusive dating relationship indicate it occurred in college.
  • 52% of college women report knowing a friend who has experienced violent and abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, digital, verbal or controlling abuse.
  • Further, 58% of students said they would not know how to help if they knew someone was a victim.

“The findings of this survey prove that colleges and universities need to provide a more comprehensive response and additional creative educational programs to address dating violence and abuse,” said Jane Randel, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications, Liz Claiborne Inc.

The survey findings were released today, during a forum to educate students about sexual assault prevention and survivor assistance at American University.

The full report of survey results can be found at www.loveisnotabuse.com.

National Dating Abuse Helpline and Break the Cycle Respond to the Urgent Need for Education

In direct response to these new findings, www.loveisrespect.org, a partnership between the National Dating Abuse Helpline and leading teen dating violence prevention organization, Break the Cycle, is launching an initiative to target college students with new, relevant resources to address the issue of dating abuse.

The expanded online content includes: Take Action (information on how students can get involved on their campus), Stay Safe (safety planning designed specifically for college students) and Help a Friend (information to assist bystanders). The survey shows that 57% of college students say it is difficult to identify dating abuse – substantive evidence of the need for increased education and awareness.

“It is our hope that with these targeted college resources, we can help increase knowledge about how students can combat the issue and ultimately, help prevent the prevalence of dating abuse and violence among students,” said President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline, Katie-Ray Jones.

The resources are available, free online at www.loveisrespect.org.

In addition, Liz Claiborne Inc. has created a college dating violence curriculum called Love Is Not Abuse, designed to help students deal with dating violence and abuse on campus. The first college curriculum of its kind, Love Is Not Abuse educates students about the dangers and warning signs of dating violence, offers lessons specifically on abuse via technology and provides resources where college students can find help on campus.

The Love Is Not Abuse curriculum was created by a task force consisting of educators and domestic and sexual violence experts from Columbia University, George Mason University, the University of Kansas, Virginia Community College System, Northern Virginia Community College and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) following the May 2010 murder of University of Virginia student Yeardley Love.

The Love Is Not Abuse college curriculum is available online, free at www.loveisnotabuse.com/web/guest/curriculum.

Survey Methodology

Liz Claiborne Inc. commissioned Knowledge Networks to conduct quantitative research among students enrolled in four-year colleges (ages 18 – 29). The sample for this study came from the Knowledge Networks probability-based online panel, KnowledgePanel®. Online data collection took place between September 29 to December 27, 2010. A total of 508 college students (330 women and 178 men) were surveyed.  The final sample was weighted using the Census Bureau school enrollment benchmarks for age, gender, race/ethnicity and geographic region based on the October 2009 Supplement of the Current Population Survey. It is statistically representative of all 18-29 year-old college students in the United States, with a margin of sampling error of ± 5.4 percentage points.

About Liz Claiborne Inc.

Since 1991 Liz Claiborne Inc. has been working to end domestic violence. Through its Love Is Not Abuse program, the company provides information and tools that men, women, teens and corporate executives can use to learn more about the issue and find out how they can help end this epidemic. Visit them at www.loveisnotabuse.com.

About loveisrespect.org

Loveisrespect.org is a collaboration between Break the Cycle and the National Dating Abuse Helpline. Combining resources and capacity, together they are reaching more people, building more healthy relationships and saving more lives. Loveisrespect.org is designed to:

  • Create the ultimate resource fostering healthy dating attitudes and relationships.
  • Provide a safe space for young people to access information and help in an environment that is designed specifically for them.
  • Ensure confidentiality and trust so young people feel safe and supported—online and off.

Loveisrespect.org is the ultimate resource to engage, educate and empower youth and young adults to prevent and end abusive relationships.

About the National Dating Abuse Helpline

The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, operating the phone and chat services. The Helpline, originally known as “loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline,” was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor, Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults. Accessible by phone or internet, the National Dating Abuse Helpline operates from a call center in Austin, Texas.

The Helpline offers real-time one-on-one support from peer advocates. They train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.

About Break the Cycle

Break the Cycle engages, educates and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence. Break the Cycle believes everybody has the right to safe and healthy relationships. Whether it’s teaching young people about the warning signs of abuse, safety planning or how to navigate the legal system, Break the Cycle gives teens and young adults the tools they need to live safer, healthier lives. Each year, Break the Cycle reaches more than one million youth nationwide. Visit them at www.breakthecycle.org.

PRESS CONTACT:

Amy C. Terpeluk
Tel.: (212) 583-2792
Cell: (917) 826-2326
terpeluka@ruderfinn.com

announcement

Katie Ray-Jones Named President, Sheila Marlow Named New Chief Advancement Officer

June 21, 2011 – The National Domestic Violence Hotline is pleased to announce Katie Ray-Jones has been selected to serve as President of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline.  Katie has served a Director of Operations for the Hotline since 2009.

As a member of the National Task Force to Reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and in her role as Hotline Director, Katie has made several visits to key congressional offices and is well known on Capitol Hill as a representative of the Hotline and Helpline.  Katie has distinguished herself as a leader with prominent individuals in the national domestic violence movement and with national domestic violent groups and has represented the Hotline at several key national domestic/dating violence and gender-based violence meetings.

Katie also has extensive experience working with survivors of domestic violence.  She has managed an emergency shelter, transitional and permanent housing programs, nonresidential services for survivors and their children, 24-hour hotlines, services for individuals with HIV/AIDS, housing for families who are homeless, case management programs for children who have been abused and neglected, and a therapeutic preschool for children who have witnessed violence.  She has also worked at a legal clinic that provided assistance to victims of domestic violence who were seeking restraining orders and other types of legal advocacy, provided individual therapy and facilitated groups for survivors and abusers and worked for the Texas Health and Human Services Commission administering funding to family violence providers throughout the state of Texas.

“Katie is truly a remarkable leader and we are thrilled she has taken the helm to lead this organization,” said Dyanne Purcell, CEO of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.  “Her knowledge and insight to the dynamics of domestic violence have impressed White House staff, U.S. Government officials and Hotline corporate partners.”

Katie has a bachelor’s degree in child and family development from San Diego State University and a master’s degree in Nonprofit Management and Leadership from the University of San Diego.  Katie is married and has two wonderful children, George and Maximillian.

The Hotline is also excited to announce that Sheila Marlow has joined the National Council on Family Violence as the Chief Advancement Officer.

Sheila will oversee the marketing, communications and development departments for the National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Dating Abuse Helpline and the Texas Council on Family Violence.

Sheila is originally from Dallas where she worked for accomplished agencies like The Dallas Opera, Texas Woman’s University, and most recently Big Brothers Big Sisters.  She is a skilled professional who brings with her an extensive fund raising experience to the agency.

Ms. Marlow’s development experience has resulted in millions of dollars raised for organizations including: The Dallas Opera, The Science Place, The Dallas Arboretum, and Gilda’s Club North Texas.  After completing a $55M capital campaign at Texas Woman’s University, she went on to serve as Vice President of Community Relations for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Sheila’s many volunteer commitments have included: serving on the Board for the Promising Youth Alliance, the Greater Dallas Chapter of AFP: 2007 DFW AFP Conference, Dallas host co-chairman for 2007 AFP International Conference, Committee member National Philanthropy Day Luncheon, and External Affairs Committee for the International Association of Fundraising.

“The National Council on Family Violence is pleased to have Sheila join our amazing team.  She has a proven track record of success and in these tight budget times and an ever increasing demand for our services, it is critical we have a talented professional who can help the Hotline and Helpline raise valuable private sector dollars,” said Dyanne Purcell, CEO of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

The Hotline is open 24-hours a day, every day, with assistance in 170 languages. The Hotline receives about 23,500 calls each month and has answered over 2.3 million calls during 15 years of service to victims of domestic violence.

Contact:
Angela Hale
512.289-2995
angela@redmediagroup.com