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happy-new-year

Happy New Year From The Hotline!

It’s been an amazing year of milestones for the hotline, and we couldn’t have done it without the kindness and generosity from all of you. We are so grateful to our supporters who helped us create healthier families and communities 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The hotline saw growth and change in 2013:

  • This summer we answered our 3 millionth call, a somber milestone that allowed us to reflect on the people we’ve been able to help and the work that still needs to be done.

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  • In October we revamped our website… and launched online chat services! Victims, friends and family now have a new way to interact with an advocate and get help safely, quickly and anonymously from any device with internet access.

  • In October we asked, “How do you see DV?” and the responses were more than could’ve imagined. We featured blog posts by everyone from Denver Broncos’ Chris Harris, Jr., to Jasmine Villegas.

  • Our loveisrespect advocates have seen a record number of young people reaching out for help via text (“loveis” to 22522) and chat.

  • Vice President Joe Biden stopped by our Austin, TX headquarters during Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Check out this great recap of his visit.

  • We launched the 24/7/365 Society. A pledge of $1,000 a year for three years secures a place as a founding member of the society, recognizing your constant support of victims of domestic violence.

  • We participated in Giving Tuesday for the first time ever. On December 3rd our advocates and staff joined together to build a Gingerbread Hotline. With each donation we added a fun item to the hotline, representing how each gift builds and strengthens our ability to help more survivors, families and friends.

  • In December, the Avon Foundation for Women offered to match any gifts we received, up to $200,000. This was a great opportunity, because each gift did twice the good.

It’s been a great year of change, and we’re looking forward to what the coming year will bring. From all of us here at the hotline, we’re so appreciative to have a strong community of supporters and friends working to build a world of healthier relationships. Thank you for helping us serve 24/7/365.

Remember that we’re always just a phone call or chat away. 1-800-799-SAFE (7233). Wishing you a safe, happy and healthy new year.

 

jasminev

Jasmine V: I See a Happy Life After DV

dvam-jasmine-vToday the young singer, actress and advocate Jasmine V tells us how domestic violence has impacted her journey and why she feels we should all get involved.

Your song “Paint a Smile” is an optimistic anthem about your recovery from an abusive relationship. What did that song mean for you personally? How do you feel when you perform it?

Paint a Smile is definitely for me the brighter side of this situation. Although domestic violence is unfortunate, for me it changed by point of view on life and what I deserve. I love the song and every time I perform it I think of the people that relate and how I helped them.

Sharing your story is incredibly brave. What motivated you to spread the word about abusive relationships?

Well it was my first time being in a situation like that and I knew there was so many other boys/girls that go through it. Very few people talk about it and I wanted to be the one that did.

What does healthy dating look like to you?

To me healthy dating is when u can count more good times than bad times. Always having fun, not taking everything so serious and giving one another a chance to breathe and making sure that person adds value to your life.

Your video for “Didn’t Mean It” depicts an abusive relationship. Was it difficult to film?

It was difficult to film, but it was also a weight of my shoulders when we released it because I knew I was giving people a chance to see exactly what was happening at the time. Although I could show how bad it was when it all escalates, I also just wanted people to see how it starts sometimes.

In the “Didn’t Mean It” video, your character has a hard time leaving the relationship. What do people need to know about the experience of leaving an abusive partner?

When I was in the abusive relationship it was hard to leave because I was so scared he was gonna hurt me again like he did before. I took care of him so I almost felt like a parent to him more than a girlfriend because he didn’t have anything. When I built the strength to leave you wouldn’t believe how happy I was!

Do you have any words of encouragement for fellow survivors during Domestic Violence Awareness Month?

Yes, I am so happy and proud that you took the courage to realize your worth and leave a unfortunate situation! You’re truly blessed and know that you made the right decision to leave because no one deserves to be hurt!

You have amazing fans in your Jasminators. After you opened up about your experience, what was their response?

A lot of my Jasminators were shocked, and it was a little scary to see the reactions. I got a lot of messages talking about how their they’re going through it along with their mothers, sisters, and friends. They told me by watching my video it gave them strength to get out of their relationships.

Please finish this sentence: I see domestic violence  ___________.

I see domestic violence as an act when someone doesn’t feel in control or has hatred inside themselves. If more people speak up, not only people in the relationships but people who witness it, we can all make a change little by little!

 


About Jasmine V

The multi-talented Jasmine V is a rising star that shows no sign of stopping. After she starred in Justin Beiber’s Baby music video, she supported him on his 2010-2011 “My World” tour. In 2012, she released her first music video for her single Didn’t Mean It. The video focuses on domestic violence awareness, and the video hit #1 for two weeks on MTV.com. Within the first 24 hours after releasing the music video she had 14 worldwide trending topics on twitter. In addition, Jasmine’s TV credits include guest-starring roles on such shows as Disney Channel’s “That’s So Raven,” Touchstone Pictures’ “My Wife and Kids”. She was cast as a series regular Disney pilot sitcom “House Broken”, a spin-off of Disney’s “The Suite Life of Zach and Cody,” starring Brian Stepanek and Selena Gomez. She also had recurring roles on such shows as ABC’s short lived but critically acclaimed series “The Nine.” Jasmine has also been featured in Kanye West’s music video Jesus Walks and Frankie J‘s How To Deal. Learn more at jasminevmusic.com.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

DVAM Challenge 11: The Journey of Hope

In honor of DVAM, we have teamed up with Verizon for the Journey of Hope. The Journey of Hope is a cross-country bus tour which will help raise awareness of domestic violence and provide resources to those affected by it.

“We are honored to be a part of Verizon’s campaign to help end domestic violence and pleased to partner with a corporation that inspires their employees and community members to get involved in this important social issue,” said our own Katie Ray-Jones, president of The Hotline and The National Dating Abuse Helpline, who will be travelling with the bus for several stops. “Verizon is a key supporter in our mission to prevent this silent epidemic, and we look forward to seeing the communities’ response to our efforts.”

The Journey of Hope kicked off its trip on Oct. 3 in Basking Ridge, N.J. at Verizon’s headquarters with a Walk for Hope event. More than 500 employees joined together to support domestic violence victims and survivors (Verizon pledged to donate $100 to The Hotline for every staff member that attended) and teen recording artist Jasmine Villegas was on hand to offer entertainment to participants.

Throughout the tour, members of the travelling group, including Katie, will speak with people affected by domestic violence and those working to end domestic violence in our communities. Everyone is invited to visit the bus, which will stop in six cities, to share their stories of support, survival, hope and perseverance.

People who visit the bus will also have the opportunity to donate used cell phones to Verizon’s HopeLine project (which we highlighted in DVAM challenge 10). Phones collected through the HopeLine recycling drives are either refurbished and sold or recycled, and the proceeds are donated to organizations that work against domestic violence in the form of cash grants and prepaid Verizon Wireless phones for survivors.

Since the launch of HopeLine in 2001, Verizon has awarded more than $14.2 million in cash grants to domestic violence agencies around the country, and nearly 123,000 phones have been handed out to those affected by domestic violence.

At The Hotline, we want to thank Verizon for their longstanding commitment to making a positive difference in the lives of those affected by domestic violence.

DVAM Challenge 11:

Raise awareness and show your support for those affected by domestic violence by wearing a purple piece of clothing. When people ask you about your outfit, tell them about domestic violence and DVAM. And don’t forget to send us a picture of your purple clothes — email us at submissions@ndah.org.