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FVPSA Celebrates Its 30th Anniversary

While we’re raising awareness on the important issue of domestic violence during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we’re also celebrating the 30th anniversary of a vital piece of legislation: The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA).

FVPSA’s passage in 1984 marked the first time in U.S. history that federal resources were specifically dedicated to domestic violence shelters and programs. The Hotline, first established by the Violence Against Women Act (which is celebrating its 20th anniversary!), is now made possible in part by FVPSA funding.

To commemorate these 30 years, the Hotline team collaborated with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, the Family & Youth Services Bureau, and other key organizations to create a short video about FVPSA and what it has done for victims and survivors of domestic violence. To learn more about FVPSA and domestic violence, visit www.LearnAboutFVPSA.com.

 

 

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#SeeDV This October

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act and the 30th anniversary of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act – two vital pieces of legislation that led to an increase of resources and support for victims and survivors of domestic violence.

In the last month, we’ve watched as the conversation about domestic violence in this country made a huge shift. Media outlets are talking about it, people on Twitter are talking about it, the NFL is talking about it, government leaders are talking about it.

But there is still work to be done. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and it’s more important than ever for your voice to be heard. That’s why this year, we’re asking again:

How do you #seeDV?

We’re asking because domestic violence should be talked about.

We’re asking because it shouldn’t be something shameful or hidden.

We’re asking for every person living with abuse, for every survivor, for every family, for every community affected.

Throughout the month, we’ll be sharing different perspectives and stories from people around the country on how they see DV. Some are survivors. Some are activists. They all “see” domestic violence as something we can end together. But we have to speak up.

So let’s start talking. How do you #seeDV?

Want to get involved? Click here.

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National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

President Obama Signs Legislation Aimed at Preventing Child Abuse and Domestic Violence

The Hotline was directly impacted by a piece of legislation signed December 20 that reauthorized the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act  (CAPTA). CAPTA provides federal funding to states, which is then distributed to public agencies and nonprofit organizations for programs and projects supporting a variety of goals necessary for eliminating family violence. FVPSA, a provision of the Child Abuse Amendments of 1984, helps fund family violence state coalitions and more than 2,000 domestic violence shelters and safe-houses.

Lynn Rosenthal, the White House Advisor on Violence Against Women, wrote a powerful post on the White House blog describing the event. Please read that article here. She described the experience of being present during the signing:

This afternoon, I stood in the Oval Office and watched as President Obama signed the reauthorization of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) which includes the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA.)  As he signed this crucial bill into law, the President was surrounded by Senators and Representatives, both Democrats and Republicans, and national advocates who work every day to end domestic violence and child abuse.

CAPTA helps The Hotline support the victims who reach out to us for guidance and protection. As an organization, we are extremely grateful to the government support we’ve been given to continue providing these life-saving services.

Rosenthal concluded her post with this moving remark:

Thanks to the bi-partisan work of members of Congress who were with us today, CAPTA and FVPSA will help end abuse, give hope to victims, and provide families with the help they need. As we gathered in the Oval Office, I was thinking of the many abuse survivors I have met over the years. Thanks to CAPTA and FVPSA, their future looks brighter.

To learn more about CAPTA, please click here.

To learn more about FVPSA, please click here.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

Family Violence Prevention and Services Act Passes U.S. Senate and House

Last week the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives voted to reauthorize the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) as part of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA). This bill ensures The Hotline will continue answering calls from victims of domestic violence from across the country and that domestic violence shelters providing support to victims and their children when fleeing abusive homes will continue to exist. The passage of FVPSA/CAPTA by both the Senate and House demonstrates bipartisan agreement that safety of women, children and men is a priority. We look forward to President Obama signing the bill into law.  Learn more.

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The National Domestic Violence Hotline Praises the U.S. Senate and U.S. House for Passing Important Legislation that Helps Victims of Domestic Violence

Reauthorizing the Funding for the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act – Critical to Funding the National Domestic Violence Hotline

December 14, 2010 — The National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) today praised the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives for reauthorizing the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) as part of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA). This bill ensures The Hotline will continue answering calls from victims of domestic violence from across the country and that domestic violence shelters providing support to victims and their children when fleeing abusive homes will continue to exist.

“The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act is the cornerstone of our nation’s response to domestic violence, providing lifesaving services to victims of domestic violence and their children. Its passage is critical to ensuring victims of domestic violence and their children have a national hotline to call for help and that the nationwide network of domestic violence services will be there when families reach out for help,” said Dyanne Purcell, CEO of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline receives more than 22,000 calls for help each month. The Hotline, available at 1-800-799-SAFE, is the only national hotline for victims of domestic violence. The Hotline is operated by the National Council on Family Violence and has been based in Austin, Texas since it’s inception in 1996.

The Hotline provides 24-hour support, information and referral to domestic violence services across the country for victims of domestic violence, their children, family members, and others affected by such violence; and enables callers to find safety and protection in crisis situations. The Hotline receives funding through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. FVPSA ensures that safe havens and links to local resources are available when families seek to rebuild their lives.

The passage of FVPSA/CAPTA by both the Senate and House demonstrates bipartisan agreement that safety of women, children and men is a priority. We look forward to President Obama signing the bill into law.

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About us:

The National Domestic Violence Hotline was established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress. The Hotline is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families. The Hotline answers a variety of calls and is a resource for domestic violence advocates government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public.

http://www.thehotline.org/

Contact: Angela Hale
512.289.2995
redmedia@ndvh.org