pregnancy-3

Pregnancy and Abuse: Planning a Safe Child Birth

This post was contributed by Rebecca Donley and is the third in a series about pregnancy and abuse. Read the first post here and the second post here.

pregnancy-3For many first time parents, childbirth is an exciting yet frightening event. While there are many ways to prepare yourself for the birth of your child, everyone has a different version of the perfect birth, so these steps will vary from person to person.  Some people create a birth plan to outline what they would like to happen during and immediately following birth. A birth plan can include measures for safety if you are also concerned about the impact or role of an abusive partner during the birth.

As you are creating this plan, consider the allies that you will have available during the birth. If you plan to give birth at a hospital, doctors and nurses will likely be present during much of your labor process. If you are giving birth at a birthing center or at home, you may have a midwife present. Depending on your prenatal care options, you may have been able to inform these professionals about your concerns about the abuse. If not, contacting the professionals beforehand and planning some items to add to your birth plan for safety may be a possibility. You also might have a professional like a doula for support at the birth. Birth doulas provide support at hospitals, birth centers or home births, and unlike a doctor or nurse who may be supporting several patients and present only during certain parts of labor, your doula will stay with you throughout your labor process. Though doulas may not have training in domestic violence or supporting someone who is experiencing abuse, you still may be able to reach out to them for added support during your labor. While doula costs may not be covered by insurance, some doulas may be able to provide services pro bono or on a sliding scale. If you do not have a birth doula, you may want to identify a family member or friend to take on the role of labor support. When considering who to ask, keep in mind that you may want someone who will safety plan with you as opposed to for you.

Childbirth requires a lot of energy and focus. Even if you have a c-section planned in advance, that’s a major surgery that deserves your full attention. No matter your birth plan, it’s important that you be able to fully access your reserves without having distractions. If you feel like your abusive partner or ex-partner will attempt to prevent you from taking necessary steps for a safe and stress-free birth, consider adding strategies to your birth plan that will refocus and energize you. Different strategies work for different people, so practice these in advance to see what is most effective for you. These include movement exercises, breathing exercises, guided meditation or relaxation narratives, listening or singing to music and repeating positive affirmations. The key is that you are able to stay relaxed and positive.

If you have left the relationship, or go into labor while your partner isn’t present, you may determine that preventing them from finding out that you are giving birth is the safest thing for you and your child. You may be able to do this by only alerting your labor support person when you go into labor, and ensure that they know to not share this information with anyone else. When determining where you will give birth, you may want to consider whether your partner or ex knows your due date, and if they will try reaching out to area hospitals, birth centers or your support network to try find you. Once you determine a plan, let the staff at the place where you give birth know to alert you if someone tries looking for you, as well as to not provide any information about your presence or status. Give them a picture of your partner/ex, and ask that staff alert you if anyone matching their description is reported in the area. If you are giving birth outside the home, you may want to take a cab or have a friend or family member take you in a vehicle that your partner/ex will not recognize. When you leave the facility, ask your labor support to check the parking lot to ensure that your partner/ex is not waiting for you. While it is understandable that you would want to share information of your birth with social networks, consider safety before sharing updates or information. Pictures online can often be viewed by friends of friends, even if the abuser is blocked. If family and friends visit, ask them to wait on posting any photos that they take with you or the baby until after you’ve returned home.

You may need to have a plan for staying safe with the abuser present during labor as well. Creating activities to occupy your partner, like asking them to contact family and friends or pick up items from the store if they are distracting you, may be one strategy to create space for you to focus. As part of your safety measures in your birth plan, you could determine a code word to use with your doctor, nurse, midwife, doula or other labor support to alert them if you are feeling unsafe and would like your abuser removed from the room. You could also have a friend or family member stay with your partner to prevent them from interrupting your focus during childbirth. Brainstorming other strategies ahead of time is key because you will want your full energy to go towards ensuring a safe and peaceful birth. Even if your partner has limited your birth planning options, you may be able to mentally prepare yourself by researching childbirth and making a personal safety and self-care plan for each stage. Obtaining access to a phone to dial 911 in the case that your partner has prohibited you to leave the home to have the baby may be one part of an emergency safety plan. Identifying a room where you feel most safe and relaxed to labor, and preparing it in advance with the items and materials that you will need is another strategy to reduce stress during labor without external support.

Whatever your circumstance or needs, The Hotline is available to help you, whether that’s identifying local options or national resources that may enhance your safety, developing a personalized safety plan that helps you maintain your reserves for childbirth, or providing emotional support and validation during the last phase of pregnancy. We are available 24/7 at 1-800-799-7233 or via live online chat from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. CST.

3 replies
  1. Kristin says:

    IM PREGNANT AND IN IMMEDIATE DANGER OF A MAN ABUSING ME HE BROKE MY PHONEI am not from here im from [redacted],HAVE NO BODY TO HELP I CAN’T CALL ANY PLACE FOR HELP BECAUSE MY CELL IS RUNNING ON WI~FI,every one in house will lie for him if I call police.he just attacked me im afraid n have no place to go please help me. [Post has been edited to remove identifying information – moderators]

    Reply
    • HotlineAdmin_CC says:

      Kristin,

      That sounds like a really physically and emotionally unsafe relationship for you to be in. I’m glad you reached out and commented on the blog. I would really encourage you to reach out and give us a call at 1-800-799-7233 any time 24/7 or chat us online from 7am-2am CST every day. We can talk more about having a safe pregnancy as well as safety plan about leaving the abusive relationship if you are ready to do that.

      There are also ways you can make phone calls on Wi-Fi using the Google Hangouts app, or maybe you can reach out to a support person via Facebook messaging. In Independence, Missouri, there is a local shelter that has housing as well as counseling and support groups. The number there is 816-461-4673 and the website is hopehouse.net. If you are able to get in touch with them, they might tell you more about a safe place for you to go when you leave your abuser’s home, as well as other local resources you can find help from.

      Best,

      Hotline Advocate CC

      Reply
  2. @NationalDVAM says:

    Thanks for this post! The NRCDV has information intended to help advocates in supporting survivors plan for their safety and wellbeing during pregnancy and child birth. Please check out our publication, “Birth Doulas and Shelter Advocates: Creating Partnerships and Building Capacity” at http://www.vawnet.org/Assoc_Files_VAWnet/FINAL-April2014-DV-DOULAS.pdf. And here is the brochure, “Trauma-Informed Birth Support: Survivor + Doula + Advocate”: http://www.vawnet.org/Assoc_Files_VAWnet/NRC-Brochure-TraumaInformedBirthSupport-2015.pdf. Please feel free to share these resources widely!

    Reply

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