Safety While Traveling Part 1: Traveling with an Abusive Partner

safe-travel-1Planning a trip can be stressful, but if you’re leaving town with your abusive partner, you might be more concerned about your own safety while traveling. We wanted to offer a few tips that may help you protect yourself.

We always emphasize creating a safety plan for any given scenario. Having a plan can help you cope while traveling or provide opportunities for escape if necessary. If you are traveling with your abusive partner, consider making a plan for your emotional safety. What this looks like can differ from person to person, but it might include books, music or other favorite activities that calm you or make you comfortable. Don’t forget to incorporate self-care while on the road, even if it’s something small, like a quick meditation. offers guided meditations in varying increments of time and even has apps for Androids and iPhones.

It’s also important to consider your physical safety and health while traveling, if you are concerned your partner might become physically abusive. You may want to fully know your rights and options for seeking safe/affordable healthcare while travelling away from home. Because reporting laws for medical providers are different from state to state, you may want to ask your provider what they would need to disclose to the authorities if they are made aware of it (e.g. “If someone was to disclose that someone else harmed or attempted to harm them, would you have to contact law enforcement to make a report?”) This way you can best decide what you feel comfortable and safe disclosing. If you do decide to make a report to a healthcare professional, ask if a copy of the medical report can be given to you or sent to a safe address for documentation.

If you have insurance, you can contact your health insurance company about how your benefits transfer if you seek medical care outside your network, or try searching for in-network providers in the area that you are traveling to. If you do not have health insurance or your insurance does not offer affordable care options in the area you are traveling to, you can look up information about low-cost, sliding scale HRSA health centers.

If you are pregnant and traveling, you may want to talk to your home pre-natal care provider about suggestions for staying safe during travel, including stress-reducing strategies. Keep their number in a safe place so you can contact a nurse or doctor in case of emergency during your travel.

Other tips to consider:

  • Give your itinerary, including where you’ll be staying and all contact information, to a trusted friend or family member.

  • Keep copies of your documents (passport, driver’s license, visa, etc.) with you if possible, and/or leave copies with a trusted friend or family member who will not be influenced by your partner.

  • Have a stash of money for yourself that you keep in a safe place. Consider keeping enough for cab fare and a night at a hotel.

  • Be aware of the available resources, such as shelters or coalitions, in the area you’re traveling to and keep their information readily available to you. Visit for a directory of domestic violence shelters in the U.S by state. It may also be a good idea to have a list of nearby hotels you can stay in if you have to escape your partner.

  • Know the emergency number for the city/country you’re staying in.

If you are in the United States, you can always call The Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 for help finding resources near you. If you are traveling internationally, these resources may be able to assist you:

UK: call Women’s Aid at 0808 2000 247
Australia: call 1800RESPECT at 1800 737 732
Worldwide: visit International Directory of Domestic Violence Agencies for a global list of helplines, shelters, and crisis centers. (Note: The Hotline has not vetted all resources listed on this site, but it’s a good place to start if you are traveling to another country)

If any of these tips would make you feel unsafe, don’t use them. You know your situation best. If you need assistance creating a plan for your unique situation, give us a call any time at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or chat online on our website from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. CT.

2 replies
  1. Crystal says:

    This information is GREAT!! And although I no longer need it, many other women do, so I am very glad to see it. Thank you.

    • Advocate says:

      Hi Crystal,

      Thank you so much for your comment! We love to receive positive feedback and it is always great to hear that we are making a difference in other people’s lives. I am glad to hear you are safe and hope that you continue to stay that way.

      If something changes and you do need to reach out to us, we are always here 24/7 by phone at 1-800-799-7233 Or 7am-2amCT through our chat in the right corner at

      Thanks Again!
      Advocate KB

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