National Domestic Violence Hotline Blog

Twit Chat: “Why Doesn’t She Leave?”

We were very excited to participate in a Twit Chat with Loop 21 about the reasons a man or woman might stay in an abusive relationship. The conversation had great participation. Read through the tweets below.

A special thanks to Loop 21 for shedding light on this topic and allowing us to participate:

What do you think? Do these reasons speak to what you, or victims in your life, experienced? Please let us know your thoughts below.

On Dec 12, 2012 we discussed barriers for leaving abusive relationships with The Loop 21: http://loop21.com

http://storify.com/NDVH/why-doesn-t-she-leave-with-the-loop-21

announcement

National Domestic Violence Hotline and National Dating Abuse Helpline extend sympathy to families of Jovan Belcher and Kasandra Perkins; offer 24 hour support and resources for all affected by domestic violence

December 2, 2012 – Officers of The National Domestic Violence Hotline and The National Dating Abuse Helpline offer deepest sympathies to the families and friends of Kansas City Chiefs player Jovan Belcher and his girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins who authorities say were killed yesterday in an apparent murder-suicide. While law enforcement officials continue their investigation into this tragedy, we want to remind all who are affected by domestic violence that support and resources are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at www.TheHotline.org  or 1-800-799-SAFE and www.LoveIsRespect.org or 1-866-331-9474.

“Today we extend our condolences to those affected by the violent deaths of Mr. Belcher and Miss Perkins. Tragically, we know from studies on murder-suicides in the U.S. that there are between 1,000 and 1,500 deaths per year in the United States as a result of murder-suicide and that three women die daily as a result of domestic violence. It is a national health problem that is not going away, but help for victims and those who love them is available,” said Katie Ray-Jones, president of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

Critical life-saving resources and support for victims, survivors, their family and friends and even abusers can be found at both hotlines that offer services around the clock in English and Spanish. Callers in crisis can expect to speak to an advocate who will triage the situation and quickly define the next steps so that they can reach safety and remain safe.  All calls to The Hotline and The Helpline are confidential.

If you would like to interview a spokesperson about domestic violence, please contact Liz Bradford at 512.685.6298 or hotline.media@ndvh.org.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline

The National Domestic Violence Hotline was established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress. The Hotline is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families. The Hotline answers a variety of calls and is a resource for domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public.

About the National Dating Abuse Helpline 

The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, operating the 24/7 phone, text and chat services. The Helpline, originally known as “loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline,” was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor, Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults. Accessible by phone or internet, the National Dating Abuse Helpline operates from a call center in Austin, Texas.

The Helpline offers real-time, one-on-one support from peer advocates. We train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned friends, parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.

Acknowledgements:

TheHotline.org is supported by Grant Number 90EV0407/03 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/Administration for Children and Families. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Administration for Children and Families or the U.S. Department of HHS.