Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Shopping for a Cause during Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and during this time, we encourage people to take a stand against domestic violence and say we will no longer tolerate domestic violence in our communities. In recognizing that it will take all of us to put an end to domestic violence, Celtic-rock band Apsylon is using their talents to bring awareness to the issue and also help support the Hotline and loveisrespect.

Throughout the month of October, Celtic-rock band Apsylon will donate one hundred percent of all digital album download sales to The Hotline and loveisrespect in an effort to help create awareness about domestic violence and teen dating abuse. Their 2010 debut album, “Dreaming of Yesterday” includes a key track, “Lena,” which tells a harrowing tale of domestic abuse and ends with a plea to end the stigma and shame that accompanies domestic violence. Blending elements of classical, Celtic folk, and rock music, Äpsylon’s album “Dreaming Of Yesterday” is available now on the band’s web site at

Download the “Lena” video.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

The Enterprise Mobility Foundation (EMF), NextFone and the National Domestic Violence Hotline Join Forces to Give Victims of Domestic Violence a Voice

The Hotline is proud to team up with The Enterprise Mobility Foundation (EMF) and NextFone to allow companies to safely recycle mobile phones and help victims of domestic violence. The year-long partnership allows companies to send old smartphones (and other mobile phones) to NextFone cost-free and NextFone will remove proprietary data from the phones and donate the current market value of phones to support The Hotline services. Join our new campaign and give victims of domestic violence a voice and donate your firm’s old smartphones to support The Hotline.


The Enterprise Mobility Foundation (EMF), NextFone and the National Domestic Violence Hotline Join Forces to Give Victims of Domestic Violence a Voice

Oct. 6, 2010– Three women are killed everyday in America in incidents of domestic violence. The Hotline is proud to team up with The Enterprise Mobility Foundation (EMF) and NextFone to allow companies to safely recycle mobile phones and help victims of domestic violence. The year-long partnership allows companies to send old smartphones (and other mobile phones) to NextFone cost-free and NextFone will remove proprietary data from the phones and donate the current market value of phones to support The Hotline services. Join our new campaign and give victims of domestic violence a voice and donate your firm’s old smartphones to support The Hotline.

“The National Domestic Violence Hotline commends the commitment of NextFone and The EMF to partner with us in the prevention of domestic violence,“ said Dyanne Purcell, National Domestic Violence Hotline CEO. “The support of the recycling program will help our trained advocates to continue answering the high volume of calls that come into The Hotline at 1-800-799 SAFE(7233). “

“NextFone is honored to join EMF in helping support The Hotline’s vital mission assisting vulnerable people in crisis,” said Eric M. Hirschfield, VP of Marketing for NextFone. “We’re proud to help businesses by environmentally sustainable and support the greater good with programs such as recycling mobile phones for The Hotline.”

”The Enterprise Mobility Foundation’s primary mission is to give back to the community of enterprise mobility enthusiasts and practitioners through education,” said Philippe Winthrop, Managing Director for the Enterprise Mobility Foundation. “Today we’re taking this vision one vital step forward by helping companies understand how they can support The Hotline and this incredibly important cause.”

Over the past 15 years, The Hotline has answered nearly 2.5 million calls from women, men, children and families in crisis. This effort will enable us to help increase our efforts to combat domestic violence across the country.


About us:

The National Domestic Violence Hotline
The National Domestic Violence Hotline was established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress. The Hotline is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families. The Hotline answers a variety of calls and is a resource for domestic violence advocates government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public.

The Enterprise Mobility Foundation
Founded in 2010, the Enterprise Mobility Foundation’s mission is to be the global community builder and evangelist for showcasing the value of successfully deploying and managing mobility solutions within organizations in the public and private sector.

NextFone is a leading mobile phone recycler for corporations and government. NextFone enables organizations to meet the challenges of old mobile devices simply, safely, responsibly and economically. NextFone is committed to making it easy for companies to support charities through donations of used mobile devices.

For Immediate Release

Contact: Susan Risdon

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

Shop till it Stops Benefits the Hotline

Did you know buying a pair of shoes can help benefit the Hotline? For every pair of shoes sold at Marshall’s stores from October 1 -15, 2010, the company will donate $1 to the Hotline (up to $150,000).

For almost two decades, Marshalls has supported the prevention and awareness of domestic violence and for the second year in a row, Marshall’s has supported the Hotline in our life-saving efforts and we are proud to stand with them and take a stand against domestic violence.

This year, in addition to the in-store program Marshalls will also be taking its symbolic exhibit to different parts of the country to further encourage people to join us and take a stand against domestic violence. You can see the exhibit at this year’s Savor the Season event on October 10, 2010 in Los Angeles and in East Harlem, NY on October 15th.

National Domestic Violence Hotline Awareness

Violence Against Women Act Turns 16

National Domestic Violence Hotline Director Katie Ray-Jones and Hotline CEO Dyanne Purcell at the reception.Last week, Vice President Joe Biden and Dr. Jill Biden hosted a reception at their home at the Naval Observatory to mark the 16th anniversary of VAWA and The Hotline and loveisrespect, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline were honored to be a part of the celebration.

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was a landmark piece of legislation that in addition to other great achievements, created the National Domestic Violence Hotline. Then-senator Joe Biden was the chief author of the 1994 legislation and has been instrumental in supporting not only The Hotline, but also working to end violence against women and girls.

We thank him and the other legislators responsible for VAWA for their hard work on behalf of victims. Please read the article that ran on the White House blog to learn more about VAWA.

(Pictured: Katie Ray-Jones, Director for the Hotline and loveisrespect, and Dyanne Purcell, CEO of the Hotline and loveisrespect at the reception.)

National Domestic Violence Hotline Blog

Domestic Violence Examined on Dr. Phil

Yesterday on a Dr. Phil episode entitled Crossing the Line, Dr. Phil counseled two couples experiencing verbal and emotional abuse in their marriages.  Often when domestic violence is discussed, it’s assumed that physical violence is involved.  This episode serves as a moving reminder that abuse can take many forms — emotional, verbal, sexual, economic, psychological, spiritual and physical.

The men on this show believed that they were not committing domestic violence because they were not inflicting physical pain on their wives. Although there are no visible scars when domestic violence is non-physical, other forms of abuse still cause long-lasting damage and pain.

Abuse is never acceptable.  Review the signs of abuse and please call The Hotline if you have questions or concerns.  We are here to help.

Please call The Hotline at 800-799-SAFE (7233) or 800-787-3224 (TTY).

National Domestic Violence Hotline Blog

Expecting Magic From Abuser Programs

The following blog entry was written by Lundy Bancroft. It has been reprinted with permission from his blog. Lundy Bancroft is an author, workshop leader, and activist on trauma, abuse, and healing. He offers dramatically new ways to understand the behavior of abusers and strategies for holding them accountable. He also brings fresh insight into the emotional injuries that trauma and abuse cause, their lasting effects, and how best to get ourselves free. He believes that all people have the right to live free from abuse and oppression. For more information about his work please click here to visit his website.

One of the questions I most commonly get asked at speaking events is, “Do programs for abusive men work?” My answer is that, when they are run well, they work as well as we can expect them to in the time they are given. A typical length for a batterer program is 52 hours — that is to say, 26 weeks for two hours a week. Sometimes the meetings are only an hour and a half, so the total time is even less. In other words, we are talking about undoing twenty or thirty or forty years of destructive socialization that has made an abusive man who he is, all in six months! The expectation is far-fetched.

I encourage people to make the comparison to substance abuse programs. If a man (or a woman, for that matter) who had been drinking or drugging heavily for five or ten or fifteen years claimed to have licked the addiction through once a week counseling for a grand total of six months, most substance abuse experts would laugh the person out of the room. In the world of recovery from addiction, the common outlook is that if you go to three or four meetings per week for a period of a year, and work hard in the program for that year, you have probably finally gotten a good start on dealing with your issues; if you stick with it for a few more years, you might succeed in really turning your life around.

Why would we expect it to be easier for a man to overcome a problem with violence and psychological viciousness toward women than to deal with a drinking problem? Abusiveness is just as deep a problem as addiction, and every bit as destructive — in fact, often more so.

If society decides that it’s time to send abusers the message that we take their crimes against women seriously, and that we refuse to live in a society that is shaped by domestic terrorists, we will start sending abusers to programs that they have to attend at least three times a week for two to three years. This will bring us in line with the kind of effort, and the length of time, that it takes to make personal changes from deep, destructive, dangerous problems. Until then, we’re continuing the pattern of slapping abusers on the wrist and sending them the message that change is optional. And if it’s optional, very few abusers are going to choose to do the work, and make the sacrifices, involved in learning to respect women’s rights.


Men Put on Heels for Domestic Violence

The following blog entry was written by Amanda Dyson.

Many of us looked forward to July 4th for the long, fun filled weekend that it promised. Others had domestic violence on their minds.

It has been reported that in July in Tulsa, Oklahoma that domestic violence calls and requests for emergency protective orders are in higher demand after long weekends, especially the Tuesday after July 4th weekend. Part of the reason for the holiday surge may be increased drug or alcohol use and gathering together for festivities.

In Louisiana, men took a different holiday weekend approach for the Lake Charles 4th of July parade. 120 men, along with women’s shelter employees, put on their high heels to march against domestic violence with shouts of “Man up! Hands down! Stop domestic violence!” The group aims to have more men speak up for the issue and aren’t the only ones using footwear to make a statement.
Recently, men signed up to walk a mile in heels during Riverfest in LaCrosse, Wisconsin. The event raised money for the YWCA and the Carilee Fund and served to bring awareness to sexual assault and domestic violence in the community.

Men are sending an important message by showing their support to end domestic violence.  For some, July 4th weekend turned out to be an interesting weekend to promote awareness and walk in someone else’s shoes.

Domestic Violence Increase During Holidays
Men March Against Violence
Hundreds of Men Walking in Heels to March Against Domestic Violence

National Domestic Violence Hotline Blog

Promoting Active GPS Technology to Protect Victims of Domestic Violence

The following blog entry was written by Amanda Dyson.

Laws for sex offenders to wear global positioning system (GPS) devices vary by state. Some states, such as Missouri, Florida, Oklahoma, and Ohio, require certain sex offenders to wear GPS bands for life. Currently, it is not mandatory for abusers in domestic violence cases to wear a GPS tracking device; people are speaking up about this issue.

In March, Assemblyman Felix Ortiz spoke out for legislation he calls the Erika Bill, which would require any individual with an order of protection issued due to domestic violence to wear an ankle GPS monitoring device. The bill is named after Erika Delia, who was murdered by an ex-boyfriend while a restraining order was in effect.  Ortiz made the point that “every 15 seconds an instance of domestic violence occurs.”

Active GPS technology is the safest option for all victims of abuse. Passive GPS tracking devices seem insufficient when compared to newly available active GPS devices that alert domestic abuse victims by call or text if an abuser is in close range.

This May, a sex offender in Northern California, Leonard Scroggins, removed his passive GPS tracking device. Though this technology is used with other crime prevention strategies, Scroggins was still able to make it to San Diego, where he attacked four women within two days. If he were wearing an active GPS that immediately alerted authorities when cut off, time could have been saved and lives protected.

Passive GPS tracking bands require an individual to physically observe a wearer’s activity at intervals while active GPS bands are able to send instant alerts via cell phones if a wearer violates area guidelines. Active GPS technology costs around $10-$15 a day. The small devices combine GPS and cellular technologies and do not require proximity to a separate stationary transmission box as other available monitoring systems do. These new devices may also help domestic violence victims to feel more secure that their abuser will not be able to get close without warning. Though some GPS companies advertise active GPS technology and may provide 24 hour monitoring, not all devices are said to provide cell phone alerts.

Active GPS technology has become available for local authorities to implement in cases. Recently, GPS Monitoring Solutions demonstrated its active GPS product in California for court employees, lawyers and victims of domestic violence. Their technology concentrates on victim notification and provides real-time location tracking with the TrackerPal.

A Texas based company, Satellite Tracking of People LLC, provides a BlueTag Active band that transmits data at least once every ten minutes. Attorney General and Minister of Justice Kim Wilson wore an ankle bracelet for one week to test the device and feels that it could serve as an incentive for rehabilitation for offenders and cut down on prison populations in Bermuda.

As GPS devices continue to improve and individuals help to speak out on behalf of domestic violence, technology can be used as a safer and more reliable option to protect victims of abuse.

Last year, Cherry Simpson wrote for the Survivor’s Blog on how GPS tracking kept her daughter safe in an abusive relationship. Read her story here. This is only one example of how GPS technology has helped in a domestic violence situation, surely there are many more. Victims of domestic violence can seek an order of protection, but a piece of paper is not always enough. Active GPS devices should still be used in combination with other safety measures and victims should remain alert to the reality that the technology is not foolproof.



Judge Jeanine Pirro, Host of “Judge Pirro,” Joins Forces With NDVH to Promote An Educational Initiative Against Domestic Violence

Chicago, IL and Austin, TX — Emmy® nominated Judge Jeanine Pirro is teaming up with the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) to launch an educational initiative about domestic violence prevention through her one-hour daily syndicated court program, “Judge Pirro.”  Pirro’s goal is to bring more attention to this nationwide crisis in conjunction with the NDVH, the national non-profit organization that provides crisis intervention, information and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends and families. The Hotline has received more than two million calls from abused women and families in crisis over the past 15 years.

In the upcoming 2010/2011 season, Judge Pirro will incorporate safety tips and action plans and provide resources within the show as well as on the show’s website,  In order to aid in the eradication of domestic violence, “Judge Pirro” will raise awareness about what constitutes emotional, physical and sexual abuse and will work to provide numerous resources that are available to those who may be in unhealthy relationships. In November 2009, “Judge Pirro” produced an entire episode focused on the domestic violence issue and provided the NDVH toll free number on the show.  As a result, the Hotline saw a 25% increase in call volume. Both the show and the NDVH see this partnership as a natural fit for their shared goals.

“I know true justice will not be done until we understand that our obligation doesn’t end with punishing the abuser.  We must also reach out to heal the victims,” said Judge Jeanine Pirro.

“When I started as a prosecutor, a man could shoot, stab, beat or brutalize his wife with no consequences.  A woman could not charge her husband with rape. These were not considered crimes.  There was a flawed notion that violence and rape in the home were beyond the reach of the law, protected by a family’s right to privacy.”

Pirro continued, “The public has to be educated about domestic violence. Every time a victim is ignored, or a criminal goes unpunished, or violence is excused, our society erodes further.  It becomes harder, meaner, and more violent.  Without redress, victims become despairing and embittered; often they exact their price by victimizing others. We all understand the cycle of violence.”

“We are honored to partner with Judge Pirro and raise awareness about domestic violence because education is the key to preventing family violence,” said Dyanne Purcell, CEO of the National Domestic Violence Hotline. “Parents, friends and family members need to be aware of the warning signs of an abusive relationship and know where to turn for resources before the violence escalates.”

Judge Jeanine Pirro was the first female County Court Judge elected in 1990 and Westchester’s first female District Attorney in 1993.  Throughout her political and legal career, Pirro crusaded to change laws in order to protect women and children. From successfully starting the first domestic violence unit in the nation to tenaciously fighting for a level playing field for women, children and the disenfranchised, Judge Pirro has used her insight, education, and professional experience to make a difference in the lives of many.  Pirro is constantly called upon to be a legal commentator and guest host on national cable and broadcast news outlets because and her profound insight of topical news stories that grip the nation every day.

Judge Pirro is an active member of the National Domestic Violence Hotline Celebrity Board and is joined by actress Salma Hayek and singer Martina McBride.

About “Judge Pirro”:
“Judge Pirro” (syndicated, check local listings) is produced by Telepictures Productions and originates from Chicago.

About The National Domestic Violence Hotline:
The National Domestic Violence Hotline, headquartered in Austin, Texas, provides anonymous and confidential life-saving support, crisis intervention, safety planning, information and referrals 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year through a toll-free confidential call center which operates in 170 languages through interpreter services. Additional information may be obtained at <> or by calling 1-800-799-7233.


Laura Danford Mandel
Senior Vice President, Publicity
Telepictures Productions

Jessica Fielder
“Judge Pirro”

Susan Risdon
National Domestic Violence Hotline


NASCAR Driver Kenny Wallace Starts His Engine With The National Domestic Violence Hotline

Charlotte, North Carolina—May 28, 2010 —The National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) is sponsoring NASCAR Nationwide driver Kenny Wallace this Saturday, May 29th at the Charlotte Motor Speedway to raise awareness that domestic violence is unacceptable. The Hotline logo and phone number will be on the side of the #28 Chevy in the 300 mile showdown for the TECH-NET Auto Service 300 race.

Kenny is standing up and speaking out about this important issue in a Public Service Announcement (PSA) for The Hotline.  Kenny cares about the safety of families. He’s been married to his high school sweetheart for more than 20 years and is the father of three daughters. “I want to send a message that hitting is never acceptable and be respectful of your loved ones, “said Wallace. “I want to set an example as a loving husband and father that any type of violence is never okay.”

“Kenny is a great role model because he leads by example and is speaking up on this important issue. He is also teaching his daughters about being in safe and good relationships,” said Dyanne Purcell, CEO of The Hotline. “Strong men speaking out are a vital part of getting the message to resonate that domestic violence is preventable.”

To watch the PSA, click here.